patroness

(redirected from patronesses)
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pa·tron·ess

 (pā′trə-nĭs)
n.
1. A woman who supports, protects, or champions someone or something, such as an institution, event, or cause; a sponsor or benefactor.
2. A woman who possesses the right to grant an ecclesiastical benefice to a member of the clergy.
3. A patron saint. See Usage Note at -ess.

patroness

(ˈpeɪtrənˌɛs)
n
1. a woman who sponsors or aids artists, charities, etc; protector or benefactor
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) See patron saint
[see patron]
patronal adj
ˈpatronly adj

pa•tron•ess

(ˈpeɪ trə nɪs)

n.
a woman who protects, supports, or sponsors someone or something.
[1375–1425; late Middle English patronesse female patron saint < Old French]
usage: See -ess.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patroness - a woman who is a patron or the wife of a patronpatroness - a woman who is a patron or the wife of a patron
sponsor, supporter, patron - someone who supports or champions something
Translations

patroness

[ˈpeɪtrənes] N [of enterprise] → patrocinadora f; [of the arts] → mecenas f

patroness

n (= sponsor)Gönnerin f; patroness of the artsKunstmäzenin f
References in classic literature ?
'Patrons and Patronesses, and Vice-Patrons and Vice-Patronesses, and Deceased Patrons and Deceased Patronesses, and Ex-Vice-Patrons and Ex-Vice-Patronesses, what does it all mean in the books of the Charities that come pouring in on Rokesmith as he sits among 'em pretty well up to his neck!
If I buy a ticket for a Flower Show, or a Music Show, or any sort of Show, and pay pretty heavy for it, why am I to be Patroned and Patronessed as if the Patrons and Patronesses treated me?
It was a great thing for Lawson, who was extravagant and earned little money: he had arrived at that stage of the portrait-painter's career when he was noticed a good deal by the critics and found a number of aristocratic ladies who were willing to allow him to paint them for nothing (it advertised them both, and gave the great ladies quite an air of patronesses of the arts); but he very seldom got hold of the solid philistine who was ready to pay good money for a portrait of his wife.