patronymic


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pat·ro·nym·ic

 (păt′rə-nĭm′ĭk)
adj.
Of, relating to, or derived from the name of one's father or a paternal ancestor.
n.
A name so derived.

[Late Latin patrōnymicus, from Greek patrōnumikos, from patrōnumos, named after one's father : patēr, patr-, father + onuma, name; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots.]

pat′ro·nym′i·cal·ly adv.

patronymic

(ˌpætrəˈnɪmɪk)
adj
(Sociology) (of a name) derived from the name of its bearer's father or ancestor. In Western cultures, many surnames are patronymic in origin, as for example Irish names beginning with O' and English names ending with -son; in other cultures, such as Russian, a special patronymic name is used in addition to the surname
n
(Sociology) a patronymic name
[C17: via Late Latin from Greek patronumikos, from patēr father + onoma name]

pat•ro•nym•ic

(ˌpæ trəˈnɪm ɪk)

n.
1. a name derived from the name of a father or ancestor, esp. by the addition of a suffix or prefix indicating descent, as Williamson (son of William) or Macdonald (son of Donald).
adj.
2. (of a family name) derived from the name of a father or ancestor.
3. (of a suffix or prefix) indicating descent from a father or ancestor.
[1605–15; < Late Latin patrōnymicus < Greek patrōnymikós=patrṓnym(os) patronymic (see patri-, -onym) + -ikos -ic]
pat`ro•nym′i•cal•ly, adv.

patronymic

a name derived from a father or paternal ancestor. Cf. metronymic.
See also: Names
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patronymic - a family name derived from name of your father or a paternal ancestor (especially with an affix (such as -son in English or O'- in Irish) added to the name of your father or a paternal ancestor)
name - a language unit by which a person or thing is known; "his name really is George Washington"; "those are two names for the same thing"
Emerald Isle, Hibernia, Ireland - an island comprising the republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland
Adj.1.patronymic - of or derived from a personal or family name
Translations
Vatersname

patronymic

[ˌpætrəˈnɪmɪk]
A. ADJpatronímico
B. Npatronímico m

patronymic

adjpatronymisch
nPatronymikon nt, → Vatersname m

patronymic

[ˌpætrəˈnɪmɪk] adj & npatronimico/a
References in classic literature ?
Levin was just about to enter into conversation with the old waiter, when the secretary of the court of wardship, a little old man whose specialty it was to know all the noblemen of the province by name and patronymic, drew him away.
Thorley Chivers, but who, having received a Papal title, had resumed her first husband's patronymic, and called herself the Marchioness Manson, because in Italy she could turn it into Manzoni) the little girl received an expensive but incoherent education, which included "drawing from the model," a thing never dreamed of before, and playing the piano in quintets with professional musicians.
His name was Sven Anderssen, his one pride being that his patronymic was spelt with a double "s."
I fall into my country's habit of putting your patronymic first, my friend Jonathan Harker will not be by my side to correct and aid me.
But if I were you, Kirylo Sidorovitch," he continued, leering and laying a peculiar emphasis on the patronymic," I wouldn't boast at large of the introduction.
Statius also repeatedly identifies Adrastus by his lineage, using the patronymic Talaionides.
What Meid and others have crucially failed to appreciate in making this identification is that the patronymic use of Greek -[[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] has a very close correspondent in lndic and Iranian in the suffix -ana-.
I wish to examine the way Euripides highlights and explores this issue through a pattern that links together all the sections of the play: the pattern of patronymic reference.
On account of his patronymic, "Jacquet," a very common one in France, the artist frequently uses homonyms--the most obvious being the game of jacquet, or backgammon, which appears in his earliest works.
Who is son and who is father?" the lawmaker interrogated.Ulan Melisbek said in Kyrgyz his patronymic should not have the ending "-vich".