patronymic

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pat·ro·nym·ic

 (păt′rə-nĭm′ĭk)
adj.
Of, relating to, or derived from the name of one's father or a paternal ancestor.
n.
A name so derived.

[Late Latin patrōnymicus, from Greek patrōnumikos, from patrōnumos, named after one's father : patēr, patr-, father + onuma, name; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots.]

pat′ro·nym′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

patronymic

(ˌpætrəˈnɪmɪk)
adj
(Sociology) (of a name) derived from the name of its bearer's father or ancestor. In Western cultures, many surnames are patronymic in origin, as for example Irish names beginning with O' and English names ending with -son; in other cultures, such as Russian, a special patronymic name is used in addition to the surname
n
(Sociology) a patronymic name
[C17: via Late Latin from Greek patronumikos, from patēr father + onoma name]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pat•ro•nym•ic

(ˌpæ trəˈnɪm ɪk)

n.
1. a name derived from the name of a father or ancestor, esp. by the addition of a suffix or prefix indicating descent, as Williamson (son of William) or Macdonald (son of Donald).
adj.
2. (of a family name) derived from the name of a father or ancestor.
3. (of a suffix or prefix) indicating descent from a father or ancestor.
[1605–15; < Late Latin patrōnymicus < Greek patrōnymikós=patrṓnym(os) patronymic (see patri-, -onym) + -ikos -ic]
pat`ro•nym′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

patronymic

a name derived from a father or paternal ancestor. Cf. metronymic.
See also: Names
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.patronymic - a family name derived from name of your father or a paternal ancestor (especially with an affix (such as -son in English or O'- in Irish) added to the name of your father or a paternal ancestor)
name - a language unit by which a person or thing is known; "his name really is George Washington"; "those are two names for the same thing"
Emerald Isle, Hibernia, Ireland - an island comprising the republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland
Adj.1.patronymic - of or derived from a personal or family name
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Vatersname

patronymic

[ˌpætrəˈnɪmɪk]
A. ADJpatronímico
B. Npatronímico m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

patronymic

adjpatronymisch
nPatronymikon nt, → Vatersname m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

patronymic

[ˌpætrəˈnɪmɪk] adj & npatronimico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
When Achelous introduces Ovid's Mestra, he notably refers to her patronymically and periphrastically as the 'daughter of Erysichthon, who wed / Autolycus' (8.1042-3).
In Algeria, as elsewhere in North Africa and the Middle East, the son bears not only his given name, which is confirmed in a name-day ceremony when he is a week old, but also the name of his father, for he may always be called patronymically, bin or ibn (son of) followed by his father's given name.
The power Janie acquires through appropriating homiletical discourse is comparable to the autonomy she gains through the practice of naming, unnaming, and renaming described in Sigrid King's "Power, Naming, and Their Eyes Were Watching God." From one "patronymically defined identity" to the next, Janie Crawfo rd Killicks Starks Woods is objectified, dehumanized, disempowered, and circumscribed.