paviour


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paviour

(ˈpeɪvjə) or

pavior

n
1. (Civil Engineering) a person who lays paving
2. (Civil Engineering) a machine for ramming down paving
3. (Civil Engineering) material used for paving
[C15: from paver, from pave]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paviour - a machine for laying pavementpaviour - a machine for laying pavement  
machine - any mechanical or electrical device that transmits or modifies energy to perform or assist in the performance of human tasks
References in classic literature ?
The tradesman leaves his counter, and the car-man his waggon; the butcher throws down his tray; the baker his basket; the milkman his pail; the errand-boy his parcels; the school-boy his marbles; the paviour his pickaxe; the child his battledore.
Externally there are well maintained low maintenance gardens to front, side and rear with brick paviour driveway and an attached garage.
To the front of the European build is a brick paviour driveway providing ample parking, outside water supply, external lighting and side access via gate.
Outside to the front is a delightful garden area and brick paviour driveway-parking to garage; award wining garden to rear with paved patio, lawned area, beds with a wide variety of planting, water feature and two garden ponds, timber pergola with wisteria, timber summer house and large hobbies shed.
Mike Paviour, Living Waters Waikato Site Lead, said developing the programme is a vital part of the partnerships long term success.
As part of the closure the National Library of Australia took on a large collection of journals, unpublished scores, music which made up part of Albert's Hire Library (by composers Colin Brumby, Nigel Butterley, Ian Cugley, Ross Edwards, Helen Gifford, Alfred and Mirrie Hill, Paul Paviour, Margaret Sutherland and Felix Werder).
Externally, to the front of the property there is a brick paviour driveway and forecourt with raised, well-stocked flower beds.
Cold workmen told to 'jump up and down' A TEESSIDE paviour claimed he lost his job because he refused to work without heating being provided on a freezing cold day.
Women were also paid for work as glazier, paviour, and coal dealer, not trades one would necessarily expect to find undertaken by women in the eighteen century.