pawl


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Related to pawl: pal, en bloc, Wikipedia, PQWL
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pawl

pawl

 (pôl)
n.
A hinged or pivoted device adapted to fit into a notch of a ratchet wheel to impart forward motion or prevent backward motion.

[Perhaps variant of pale or pole, or from French pal (from Old French; see pale1).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pawl

(pɔːl)
n
(Mechanical Engineering) a pivoted lever shaped to engage with a ratchet wheel to prevent motion in a particular direction
[C17: perhaps from Dutch pal pawl]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pawl

(pɔl)

n.
a pivoted bar adapted to engage with the teeth of a wheel so as to prevent movement or to impart motion.
[1620–30; < Dutch pal ratchet]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pawl - a hinged catch that fits into a notch of a ratchet to move a wheel forward or prevent it from moving backwardpawl - a hinged catch that fits into a notch of a ratchet to move a wheel forward or prevent it from moving backward
catch, stop - a restraint that checks the motion of something; "he used a book as a stop to hold the door open"
rachet, ratch, ratchet - mechanical device consisting of a toothed wheel or rack engaged with a pawl that permits it to move in only one direction
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

pawl

[pɔːl] Ntrinquete m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pawl

nSperrklinke f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
It gave me the impression of a disordered mechanism which had escaped the repressive and regulating action of some controlling part--an effect such as might be expected if a pawl should be jostled from the teeth of a ratchet-wheel.
There is no order more noisily given or taken up with lustier shouts on board a homeward-bound merchant ship than the command, "Man the windlass!" The rush of expectant men out of the forecastle, the snatching of hand-spikes, the tramp of feet, the clink of the pawls, make a stirring accompaniment to a plaintive up-anchor song with a roaring chorus; and this burst of noisy activity from a whole ship's crew seems like a voiceful awakening of the ship herself, till then, in the picturesque phrase of Dutch seamen, "lying asleep upon her iron."
Once you have the hammer assembly out, the pawl can be removed by simply lifting it up out of its socket hole on the left side of the hammer.
The hand (pawl) has been checked and polished also.
The seats are likely to have been produced without a required third pawl for seatback strength.
In some of the affected vehicles, the electronic door latch pawl motor doesn't function properly, which sets a door ajar warning.
With hoisting capacities up to 750 pounds, all models are rated to lift loads vertically and incorporate automatic, load-suspending brakes and a secondary ratchet and pawl brake.