pay down


Also found in: Financial, Idioms.

pay 1

 (pā)
v. paid (pād), pay·ing, pays
v.tr.
1. To give money to in return for goods or services rendered: pay the cashier.
2. To give (money) in exchange for goods or services: paid four dollars for a hamburger; paid an hourly wage.
3. To discharge or settle (a debt or obligation): paying taxes; paid the bill.
4. To bear (a cost or penalty, for example) in recompense: She paid the price for her unpopular opinions.
5. To yield as a return: a savings plan that paid six percent interest.
6. To afford an advantage to; profit: It paid us to be generous.
7. To give or bestow: paying compliments; paying attention.
8. To make (a visit or call).
9. Past tense and past participle paid or payed (pād) To let out (a line or cable) by slackening.
v.intr.
1. To give money in exchange for goods or services.
2. To discharge a debt or obligation.
3. To bear a cost or penalty in recompense: You'll pay for this mischief!
4. To be profitable or worthwhile: It doesn't pay to get angry.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, giving, or receiving payments.
2. Requiring payment to use or operate: a pay toilet.
3. Yielding valuable metal in mining: a pay streak.
n.
1. The act of paying or state of being paid.
2. Money given in return for work done; salary; wages.
3.
a. Recompense or reward: Your thanks are pay enough.
b. Retribution or punishment.
4. Paid employment: the workers in our pay.
5. A person considered with regard to his or her credit or reliability in discharging debts.
Phrasal Verbs:
pay back
1. To pay or return (what is owed as a debt).
2. To repay (a person who is owed a debt).
3. To give recompense to; reward: How can we ever pay you back for what you've done for us?
4. To reciprocate; return: pay back a kindness.
5. To retaliate against or get revenge upon.
pay down
To reduce (a debt) through payment.
pay off
1. To pay the full amount on (a debt).
2. To result in profit or advantage; succeed: Your efforts will eventually pay off.
3. To pay the wages due to (an employee) upon discharge.
4. To pay (a plaintiff) to settle a lawsuit out of court.
5. To bribe.
6. Nautical To turn or cause to turn (a vessel) to leeward.
pay out
1. To give (money) out; spend.
2. To let out (a line or rope) by slackening.
pay up
To give over the full monetary amount demanded.
Idioms:
pay (one's) dues
To earn a given right or position through hard work, long-term experience, or suffering: She paid her dues in small-town theaters before being cast in a Broadway play.
pay (one's) way
To contribute one's own share; pay for oneself.
pay the piper
To bear the consequences of something.
pay through the nose Informal
To pay excessively.

[Middle English paien, from Old French paiier, from Late Latin pācāre, to appease, from Latin, to pacify, subdue, from pāx, pāc-, peace; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

pay 2

 (pā)
tr.v. payed or paid (pād), pay·ing, pays
To coat or cover (seams of a ship, for example) with waterproof material such as tar or asphalt.

[Obsolete French peier, from Old French, from Latin picāre, from pix, pic-, pitch.]

pay down

vb
(Commerce) (adverb) to pay (a sum of money) at the time of purchase as the first of a series of instalments
References in classic literature ?
In spite of my riches I shall not, however, give up trade till I have amassed a capital of a hundred thousand drachmas, when, having become a man of much consideration, I shall request the hand of the grand-vizir's daughter, taking care to inform the worthy father that I have heard favourable reports of her beauty and wit, and that I will pay down on our wedding day 3 thousand gold pieces.
In fact my master was so difficult to deal with that I dared not on any account pay down the money at once.
"Or else, what is much better, I deliver him up to King Charles, who, having no longer either a general or an army to fear, nor a diplomatist to trick him, will restore himself, and when once restored, will pay down to me the hundred thousand crowns in question.
Others revolve a more-or-less constant amount on an account for long periods with little pay down until a lump-sum payment of the balance in full.
In addition to the restructuring of Gold Fields' debt announced over the past few months, using the proceeds from the sales of our non-core investments to pay down debt will further improve liquidity," says Gold Fields CEO Nick Holland.
Meredith is using the transaction proceeds to pay down debt.
The strong production figures, and increasing oil prices helped the company pay down debt faster than it had expected, paying off $80m (PS62m) in the first four months of the year to $2.3bn, it revealed.
But Damac has reasons to feel relatively upbeat about two key numbers from Q1-19 -- first, it totalled sales of Dh1.2 billion, and also managed to pay down its outstanding sukuk of Dh1 billion.
It's possible, in some circumstances, to use a mortgage refinance loan to pay down debt.
Budweiser maker Anheuser-Busch InBev has confirmed that it is mulling a public listing for part of its Asian operations, in a move which could help it to pay down debt faster.
But he has also proposed issuing what are called "pension obligation bonds" to pay down part of the unfunded liability, transferring surplus state assets to the pension funds and earmarking a portion of the revenue the state would receive from his proposed graduated income tax to pay down pension debt.
The proceeds from these transactions were used to pay down the USD 3.75 billion First Lien Notes maturing in June 2019, the USD 2.0 billion Term Loan A-5 bridge loan issued to partially fund the previously completed Class V transaction, with the remaining proceeds to be used to pay down debt under the company's senior secured credit facilities.