pay for


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Related to pay for: Pay for performance

pay for

vb (preposition)
1. to make payment (of) for
2. (intr) to suffer or be punished, as for a mistake, wrong decision, etc: in his old age he paid for the laxity of his youth.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.pay for - have as a guest; "I invited them to a restaurant"
interact - act together or towards others or with others; "He should interact more with his colleagues"
References in classic literature ?
What do you pay for beef and mutton -- when you buy it?
What do you pay for a stuff gown for the wife of the laborer or the mechanic?
If they paid rent, of course, they might pay forever, and be no better off; whereas, if they could only meet the extra expense in the beginning, there would at last come a time when they would not have any rent to pay for the rest of their lives.
She distils nothing of the kind, vile rabble," said Don Quixote, burning with rage, "nothing of the kind, I say, only ambergris and civet in cotton; nor is she one-eyed or humpbacked, but straighter than a Guadarrama spindle: but ye must pay for the blasphemy ye have uttered against beauty like that of my lady.
I shall pay for the wives to their fathers and send them to you in three days.
There will be chickens, pigs, vegetables, fruit trees, and everything like that; and there will be enough cows to pay for a hired man or two.
The pile of cuffs grew into a mountain, and Martin knew that he was doomed to toil for a thousand years to pay for them.
At a word since I must needs, for once, hold a candle to the devil what ransom am I to pay for walking on Watling-street, without having fifty men at my back?
Does that mean you won't pay for it after having told me I could get it?
If you are operating in a location where it's considered acceptable--or even necessary--to pay for coverage, you should at least seek to ensure that the payment is openly acknowledged in the article or program.
In qualified plans covered by section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code, withdrawals generally are not subject to federal income tax if the money is used to pay for qualified educational expenses.
Thus, while some employers may be tempted to fund amounts sufficient to pay for catastrophic illnesses in retirement, an actuarial determination of funding for those amounts would consider the likelihood that those costs would actually be incurred.