pay-phone


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Noun1.pay-phone - a coin-operated telephonepay-phone - a coin-operated telephone    
phone, telephone, telephone set - electronic equipment that converts sound into electrical signals that can be transmitted over distances and then converts received signals back into sounds; "I talked to him on the telephone"
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References in periodicals archive ?
Depending on the city, pay-phone regulations were placed under ordinances relating to loitering, public nuisance, vending, soliciting or vandalism.
A council statement said: "The combined pay-phone and ATM machine, by virtue of its design and unsympathetic materials, in this prominent position within the Huddersfield Town Centre Conservation Area and also being surrounded by a number of Grade I and Grade II Listed Buildings, would not sustain the significance of these designated heritage assets."
Each pay-phone will provide wireless broadband network coverage within a radius of 150 metres.
High commissions can lure some independent insurance agents into selling fraudulent or high-risk investments, such as promissory notes, ATM and pay-phone investment contracts and viatical settlements, NASAA said.
that night, a motion-sensor light went on in his backyard, and at about 6:30 p.m., his wife received a pay-phone call from someone who asked for the judge, but when the judge got to the phone, the caller hung up.
Brian Hesler, chief fire officer for Northumberland, gave the warning in the wake of news that 88 pay-phone kiosks in Berwick, Alnwick and Castle Morpeth are earmarked to be axed.
'We would not leave a small community without a pay-phone but it is worth remembering that only seven per cent of emergency calls now go through pay-phones.
I don't use a mobile phone, I'm too old, and if anything went wrong with my home phone it would be re-assuring to know there is a pay-phone available," said Mrs Everitt, a former churchwarden and president of her local Women's Institute.