pay-to-play


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pay-to-play

 (pā′tə-plā′)
n.
Any of various arrangements in which payment is rendered in exchange for a specific right, service, or privilege, often one for which a charge would not always be expected, especially:
a. one in which participants pay to take part in a sport or game.
b. one in which entertainers, performers, or artists pay for public exposure of their work.
c. one in which political influence or appointments are given in exchange for contributions to a party or candidate.
d. one in which producers or distributors pay for favorable placements of their products.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The suit claims that the bank collected money from private mortgage insurance providers to refer customers under its pay-to-play reinsurance scheme.
The survey also found that other top compliance concerns among small, midsized and large RIA firms are pay-to-play rules, social media, whistleblowing, Form ADV Part 2, insider trading, anti-bribery and financial crime as well as foreign advisory activities.
And while elected officials routinely maintain the donations come with no strings attached, the growing amount of money flowing into campaign accounts, frequent violations of campaign reporting laws and recent scandals involving alleged influence pedaling by ranking legislative leaders are breeding new concerns about a "pay-to-play" culture on Beacon Hill.
The survey of 10,000 net users in the UK, Germany, France, Italy, Spain and Sweden will be welcomed by the big record companies, who have struggled to get consumers to switch from Napster-style free song-swap services to their own pay-to-play sites.
Users who register at Chameleon 24:7@Lycos will be able to access the pay-to-play gaming software which allows users to buy or rent games.
On his first day in office, he ended pay-to-play legal contracting and banned members of his administration from taking gifts from special interests.
A New Mexico state representative called on the state's attorney general to investigate possible pay-to-play activities at New Mexico investment funds overseen by the governor Wednesday.
While advisors welcome the "much-needed clarity" provided by the Securities and Exchange Commission in its June 25 frequently asked questions (FAQ) regarding compliance with a new provision in its pay-to-play rule, the FAQ "effectively renders" the formal July 31 compliance date "a nonevent," says Karen Barr, president and CEO of the Investment Adviser Association.
On March 14, the Securities and Exchange Commission's "pay-to-play" rule, officially known as the Advisers Act Rule 206(4)-5, went into effect.
When federal regulators in 2010 instituted new (https://www.sec.gov/rules/final/2010/ia-3043.pdf) ethics rules to prevent Wall Street executives from using campaign contributions to influence government investments, they pointed to New Mexico as an example of a state mired in pay-to-play practices.
The agency enacted a (https://www.sec.gov/rules/final/2010/ia-3043.pdf) pay-to-play rule that applied such a restriction to state and local officials.
The request by the unions - who represent 135,000 public school personnel in Massachusetts - revolves around federal pay-to-play rules that went into effect in 2011.