peacock butterfly

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peacock butterfly

n
(Animals) a European nymphalid butterfly, Inachis io, having reddish-brown wings each marked with a purple eyespot
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.peacock butterfly - European butterfly having reddish-brown wings each marked with a purple eyespotpeacock butterfly - European butterfly having reddish-brown wings each marked with a purple eyespot
brush-footed butterfly, four-footed butterfly, nymphalid, nymphalid butterfly - medium to large butterflies found worldwide typically having brightly colored wings and much-reduced nonfunctional forelegs carried folded on the breast
genus Inachis, Inachis - a genus of Nymphalidae
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
babočka paví oko
References in periodicals archive ?
They are closely related to small tortoiseshell, red admiral and peacock butterflies.
"The most commonly recognisable butterflies are the Small Tortoiseshell and Peacock butterflies, but those over a certain age may have noticed they saw a lot more of them in the '70s and '80s and not as many now."
I sat and watched the peacock butterflies flutter from bud to bud, while the bees bumbled around looking for flowers to land on.
For example, when did you last see some of those spiky, dark-coloured caterpillars of the Tortoiseshell and Peacock butterflies feeding on a patch of stinging nettles, or multiple species of butterflies feeding on the flowers of a privet bush allowed to grow into a small tree?
Mild weather has led to records in January of red admiral, small tortoiseshell and peacock butterflies and queen wasps, which are usually seen in mid to late February or early March.
One of her biggest paintings, 'Nanganganib (Endangered),' depicts a forest with a tarsier, Luzon peacock butterflies, a spotted deer, a Palawan peacock, a red veiled cockatoo and endangered plants such as the jade vine, the pitcher plant and the waling-waling orchid.
The number of peacock butterflies seen in the North East almost doubled, pushing the species from fifth position in the 2013 regional league table to second place this summer.
Although nettles are looked |upon as a weed by gardeners, they are a favourite egg laying plant for ladybirds and by leaving a patch of nettles to develop in your garden, you will be helping them to increase their numbers; Ladybirds are great for the |garden as they, and their larvae, will eat aphids, red spider mites, whitefly and other pests; Nettle aphids provide an early |food source for woodland birds, such as the Great Tit and Blue Tit, which have learnt to exploit the garden habitat; Later in the year, the nettle |patch can provide food for the caterpillars of the Small Tortoiseshell, Comma and Peacock butterflies, as well as the beautiful Red Admiral; At any time, the nettle foliage |can be cut down and submerged in water to make a free and totally organic liquid plant food.
Later in the year the nettle |patch can provide food for the caterpillars of the Small Tortoiseshell, Comma and Peacock butterflies as well as the beautiful Red Admiral.
Flying in the face of recent worrying declines, sightings of small tortoiseshell and peacock butterflies rose by a staggering 388 percent and 3,500 percent, respectively; compared to 2012.
Numbers of red admiral and peacock butterflies has taken a dive
The hot border in the terrace garden, which in July and August is a virtual furnace of reds and oranges, is beginning to cool, but there are still a few glowing embers: canna, ligularia, rudbeckia and dahlia are visited by late flickering red admiral and peacock butterflies. Occasionally a red squirrel crosses the lawn.