peak load

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peak load

n
(Electrical Engineering) the maximum load on an electrical power-supply system. Compare base load
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Adjustable sampling rates help capture peak loads, and filters can be applied to peak and display values.
The result of reduced modulus and hardness at a constant loading rate and holding time but various peak loads are shown in Fig.
Currently, South Australia's peak loads are managed by open-cycle gas turbine (OCGT) plants.
Building-based storage: The authors note that some grid-connected buildings may be partially controlled by a utility or ESCO that could respond when a peak is anticipated: "The building may be able to respond before the demand strikes, for example, by precooling the space or curtailing certain loads." On-site generation from backup generators or fuel cells can help offset peak loads, and building-scale batteries to store generated energy for use during peaks will become more common as prices continue to drop.
The pump will displace volumes up to 28 [cm.sup.3] per revolution and is designed for maximum operating pressure of 380 bar and peak loads of 400 bar.
The San Jose facility had higher average and peak loads than the other facilities.
The units supply continuous overloads of up to 20% or transient peak loads of 300% with ease.
ConEdison Solutions has been offering incentives to property owners who participate in energy efficiency programs designed t0 curtail energy use durin8 peak loads, which were alarmingly high during last winter's bitter polar vortex.
Ratios of margins against seasonal peak loads and minimum loads of the systems were considered.
The Ministry asks the population to save electricity, reduce the use of electric heaters in the hours of the morning and evening peak loads (from 7.00 to 9.00 am, and from 6.00 to 10.00 pm), as well as to use more coal and gas to cook and heat houses.
The average peak loads from testing were within 7 to 8 percent of predicted values.