peakedness

peakedness

(ˈpiːktnəs)
n
1. the state or quality of having a peak
2. a state of poor health
References in periodicals archive ?
The coefficient of kurtosis, which measures the peakedness of a distribution, is very high for Bilecik.
The peakedness or flatness of the distribution of each of the variables as revealed by the Kurtosis statistic were recorded to be flat or platykurtic relative to the normal for LNFMV, and LNLEV; being less than 3.
In this reverse engineering software, procedures such as smoothing surface roughness, filling cavities, elimination of peakedness, and revision of surface coincidences were performed, and NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) surfaces were obtained.
The Kurtosis statistic that measures the peakedness or flatness of the distribution of each of the series is calculated to be 3.
Kurtosis was the degree of peakedness of the distribution, defined as a normalized form of the fourth central moment of distribution.
After a determination of the average value and variance of overflow traffic, the peakedness overflow traffic coefficient is determined on the basis of both.
Pearson's measure of kurtosis can provide some interpretive value to indicate excess high or low values in the tails of a frequency distribution; and these occur alongside the excessive peakedness for which the kurtosis measure is more widely recognised (DcCarlo 1997).
Kurtosis is a measure of the peakedness of the distribution, and the high kurtosis values from the data set imply the data are non-normal and result in a sharply peaked distribution.
Leptokurtosis--that is, the tendency for financial asset returns to have distributions that exhibit fat tails and excess peakedness at the mean.
The peakedness of the price distribution measured by kurtosis is negative for five artists ranging from -1.
So kurtosis values are considered as a measure of peakedness of probability distribution of actual valued random variable.