peasant


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peas·ant

 (pĕz′ənt)
n.
1. A member of a class of small farmers and farm laborers, especially in a preindustrial or underdeveloped society.
2. A person who lives in a rural area; a rustic.
3. A person who is considered crude or uncouth; a boor.

[Middle English paissaunt, from Old French paisant, from pais, country, from Late Latin pāgēnsis, inhabitant of a district, from Latin pāgus, district; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

peasant

(ˈpɛzənt)
n
1. (Sociology)
a. a member of a class of low social status that depends on either cottage industry or agricultural labour as a means of subsistence
b. (as modifier): peasant dress.
2. informal a person who lives in the country; rustic
3. informal an uncouth or uncultured person
[C15: from Anglo-French, from Old French païsant, from païs country, from Latin pāgus rural area; see pagan]

peas•ant

(ˈpɛz ənt)

n.
1. a member of a class of small farmers or farm laborers of low social rank, as in Europe, Asia, or Latin America.
2. a coarse, uneducated person.
adj.
3. of or characteristic of peasants or their way of life.
4. modeled on the folk costumes of Western cultures: peasant blouses.
[1375–1425; late Middle English paissaunt < Anglo-French paisant, Old French païsant, earlier païsenc=païs country (< Late Latin pāgēnsis= Latin pāg(us) country district + -ēnsis -ensis) + -enc < Germanic]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.peasant - a country personpeasant - a country person      
cottar, cotter - a peasant farmer in the Scottish Highlands
moujik, mujik, muzhik, muzjik - a Russian peasant (especially prior to 1917)
rustic - an unsophisticated country person
2.peasant - one of a (chiefly European) class of agricultural laborers
peasantry - the class of peasants
agricultural laborer, agricultural labourer - a person who tills the soil for a living
fellah - an agricultural laborer in Arab countries
3.peasant - a crude uncouth ill-bred person lacking culture or refinementpeasant - a crude uncouth ill-bred person lacking culture or refinement
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable

peasant

noun
1. rustic, countryman, hind (obsolete), swain (archaic), son of the soil, churl (archaic) land given to peasants for food production
2. (Informal) boor, provincial, hick (informal, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), lout, yokel, country bumpkin, hayseed (U.S. & Canad. informal), churl Why should I let a lot of peasants traipse over my property?
Translations
فَلاّح
-kavenkovan
bondebonde-
maalainenmoukkatalonpoika
seljakseljanka
paraszt
smábóndi, sveitamaîur
valstietijavalstietis
zemnieks
roľník
kmet
köylürençber

peasant

[ˈpezənt]
A. Ncampesino/a m/f (pej) → palurdo/a m/f
a peasant revoltun levantamiento campesino or del campesinado
B. CPD peasant farmer Ncampesino m
peasant woman Ncampesina f

peasant

[ˈpɛzənt] npaysan(ne) m/fpea soup n (from green peas)soupe f aux pois; (from split peas)soupe f aux pois cassés

peasant

n (lit)(armer) Bauer, (arme) Bäuerin; (pej inf) (= ignoramus)Banause m, → Banausin f; (= lout)Bauer m; (= pleb)Prolet(in) m(f)
adj attrbäuerlich; peasant boy/girlBauernjunge m/-mädchen nt; peasant farmer(armer) Bauer; peasant labourLandarbeiterschaft f, → landwirtschaftliche Arbeitskräfte pl; peasant leaderBauernführer(in) m(f); peasant unrestBauernunruhen pl; peasant woman(arme) Bäuerin; to be from peasant stockvon bäuerlicher Herkunft sein

peasant

[ˈpɛznt]
1. ncontadino/a
2. adj (life) → dei contadini; (societies) → contadino/a; (dress) → da contadino/a

peasant

(ˈpeznt) noun
a person who lives and works on the land, especially in a poor, primitive or underdeveloped area. Many peasants died during the drought; (also adjective) a peasant farmer.
ˈpeasantry noun
peasants as a group; the peasants of a particular place. What part did the peasantry play in the Russian revolution?
References in classic literature ?
Behold yonder peasant tilling his field in peace and contentment!
Leaning upon his rake, the Peasant returned the salutation with a nod, but said nothing.
As chance would have it, when he had got to this line there happened to come by a peasant from his own village, a neighbour of his, who had been with a load of wheat to the mill, and he, seeing the man stretched there, came up to him and asked him who he was and what was the matter with him that he complained so dolefully.
The peasant stood amazed at hearing such nonsense, and relieving him of the visor, already battered to pieces by blows, he wiped his face, which was covered with dust, and as soon as he had done so he recognised him and said, "Senor Quixada" (for so he appears to have been called when he was in his senses and had not yet changed from a quiet country gentleman into a knight-errant), "who has brought your worship to this pass?" But to all questions the other only went on with his ballad.
There was a certain village wherein no one lived but really rich peasants, and just one poor one, whom they called the little peasant.
Next morning when the cows were being driven out, the little peasant called the cow-herd in and said: 'Look, I have a little calf there, but it is still small and has to be carried.' The cow-herd said: 'All right,' and took it in his arms and carried it to the pasture, and set it among the grass.
[122] shrewd, passionate, somewhat melancholy heads, which, though they are often of peasant origin, are never by any chance undignified.
"'And you would not take offence if a poor peasant like me embraced you?'
After admiring the young ones of that year, who were particularly fine--the early calves were the size of a peasant's cow, and Pava's daughter, at three months old, was a big as a yearling-- Levin gave orders for a trough to be brought out and for them to be fed in the paddock.
He was not put out of temper even by the sight of the peasants' horses and colts trampling down his young grass (he told a peasant he met to drive them out), nor by the sarcastic and stupid reply of the peasant Ipat, whom he met on the way, and asked, "Well, Ipat, shall we soon be sowing?" "We must get the ploughing done first, Konstantin Dmitrievitch," answered Ipat.
A PEASANT found an Eagle captured in a trap, and much admiring the bird, set him free.
One instance, which had occurred some twenty years before, was a movement among the peasants to emigrate to some unknown "warm rivers." Hundreds of peasants, among them the Bogucharovo folk, suddenly began selling their cattle and moving in whole families toward the southeast.