pectin

(redirected from pectinous)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to pectinous: Popliteus, adductor magnus, adductor longus

pec·tin

 (pĕk′tĭn)
n.
Any of a group of water-soluble colloidal carbohydrates of high molecular weight found in ripe fruits, such as apples, plums, and grapefruit, and used to jell various foods, drugs, and cosmetics.

[French pectine, from Greek pēktos, coagulated, from pēgnunai, to coagulate; see pag- in Indo-European roots.]

pec′tic, pec′tin·ous adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pectin

(ˈpɛktɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) biochem any of the acidic hemicelluloses that occur in ripe fruit and vegetables: used in the manufacture of jams because of their ability to solidify to a gel when heated in a sugar solution (may be referred to on food labels as E440(a))
[C19: from Greek pēktos congealed, from pegnuein to set]
ˈpectic, ˌpectiˈnaceous, ˈpectinous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pec•tin

(ˈpɛk tɪn)

n.
a white colloidal carbohydrate of high molecular weight, present in ripe fruits: used in fruit jellies for its thickening and emulsifying properties.
[1830–40; < Greek pēkt(ós) fixed, congealed (see pectic acid) + -in1]
pec′tic, pec′tin•ous, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pec·tin

(pĕk′tĭn)
Any of a group of substances that are found in ripe fruits and can be made to form gels. Pectins are derived from carbohydrates. They are used in certain medicines and cosmetics and in making jellies.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pectin

A substance extracted from ripe fruit and vegetables which is used to set jams and jellies.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pectin - any of various water-soluble colloidal carbohydrates that occur in ripe fruit and vegetables; used in making fruit jellies and jams
Kaopectate - trade name for a fixed-combination antidiarrheal drug that use kaolin as the adsorbent and pectin as the emollient
cellulose - a polysaccharide that is the chief constituent of all plant tissues and fibers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
pektin
pektin
pektiini
pektin
pektin

pectin

[ˈpektɪn] Npectina f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pectin

nPektin nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pectin

[ˈpɛktɪn] npectina
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

pec·tin

n. pectina, carbohidrato que se obtiene de la cáscara de frutas cítricas y de manzana.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Microbial activity in aqueous medium helps in eliminating pectinous gums and lignin that bind the fibers.
--increasing the emollients preparation concentration of the chemical-modifying bath; introducing pre-scouring of the technical hemp and flax fibres prior to the chemical-modifying treatment in order to soften the pectinous gums (which cement the fibre bundles) and facilitate their enzymatic hydrolysis; increasing the time of exposure to emollients preparation of the technical hemp and flax fibres while it is being subjected to pre-scouring.