pedimental


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Related to pedimental: Broken Pediment, Open pediment

ped·i·ment

 (pĕd′ə-mənt)
n.
1.
a. A wide, low-pitched gable surmounting the façade of a building in the Grecian style.
b. A triangular element, similar to or derivative of a Grecian pediment, used widely in architecture and decoration.
2. Geology A broad, gently sloping rock surface at the base of a steeper slope, often covered with alluvium, formed primarily by erosion.

[Alteration (influenced by Latin pēs, ped-, foot) of earlier perement, probably alteration of pyramid.]

ped′i·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.
ped′i·ment′ed adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among all the arguments for immortality in the Phaedo, it is the interlude against misology (aversion to reason) that claims the pedimental spotlight of the dialogue (89d-91c), thus elevating rational discourse above personal immortality, and declaring the resentment of reason a greater threat (or "folly") than the resentment of death.
The stolen artefacts continue to play a role in the life of communities through power of imagination, as, in a different way, imaginings of the Parthenon with its pedimental sculptures in place play a role in Greek national identity.
At times, say with regard to the seemingly bereft mourner in For Otto, we are reminded not only of Renaissance and Baroque compositions but also of the statuary in pedimental ensembles--specifically, the cunning way in which such figures are arranged to conform to the acute triangular extremities of that vexing format.
The British Museum's majestic pedimental figures from the Parthenon epitomize this quest for a fully dimensional sculpture, as does the Dying Gaul.
Its entrance looks back at the Tate portico and is lined with stone, and in addition is marked by a large pedimental opening ('as if a classical temple had been removed,' said Summerson), with a half round opening above that reminds us of Dance or Ledoux.