pedobaptist


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Related to pedobaptist: Infant baptism

ped·o·bap·tism

 (pĕd′ō-băp′tĭz′əm)
ped′o·bap′tist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Graves stressed that the transferee remains in limbo until joining another Baptist church, and that "[i]f he joins a Pedobaptist or Campbellite society he is still a member of the [Baptist] church from which he received his letter, and is worthy of exclusion for a renunciation of the faith and order of that church." According to Graves, there was no amnesty for traitors.
In this way, Baptists hope that a bridge can be found between their baptismal traditions and those of pedobaptist churches.
(223) For instance, in his Appeal to the Public for Religious Liberty, Backus recorded for posterity that "William White[,] a regular member of the baptist church in Ashfield, who lives in Chesterfield, and has had his standing in said church certified according to law; yet had a cow taken from him on August 25, 1773, and sold the 30th, for the pedobaptist ministers rate...." (224) In addition, some courts held that only incorporated organizations could receive the funds that were earmarked by dissenters.
Peters, a white turn-of-the-century Pedobaptist preacher of New York (Baptist Principles Reset).
One might want to locate the tension between the voluntary versus the nonvoluntary character of the church in the debate between pedobaptist and antipedobaptist positions.
Yet only because we have refused to wrong our consciences in that respect our people in various places have been taxed from year to year to [support] pedobaptist ministers," 361.
Thomas Armitage wrote that the ABS resolution in effect made ABS "a Pedobaptist or sectarian institution." See History of the Baptists (New York: Bryan, Thylor, and Co., 1887), 896.
8) In other words, the two sides of baptism, which in the debates between pedobaptist (infant baptism) churches and credobaptist (believers' baptism) churches sometimes are emphasized in a one-sided way, are kept closely together.
(12) Marginalized by the pedobaptist strains of Dissent and by the Church of England, Baptists endured criticisms for the novelty of their adult baptism in pieces such as Joseph Stokes's A Survey of Infant Baptism (1715), which Benjamin Stinton (1676-1719), Thomas Crosby's minister and brother-in-law, noted had offered no new arguments and had not received easy endorsement from Presbyterians in London for fear of creating additional divisions.
For example, Strong, like many Baptist theologians of his time, elaborately discusses the disqualification of infant baptism in his doctrine of baptism due to the continued conversation with pedobaptist groups.
Immersion should be valid if performed by a "pedobaptist" or even an unconverted person: "Baptists have always stood for the individual and the fact of his immediate relation to God; and have consistently and stoutly rejected the doctrine that an exclusive virtue comes through intermediaries of functionaries." (18) Pollard said that not accepting "alien immersion" as valid "virtually demands an apostolic succession." (19) And American Baptist history as well as English Baptist history argues against the Landmarkist successionist view of baptism:
Here the bondwoman referred to the Old Testament covenant of works, particularly circumcision and its New Testament corollary in the pedobaptist tradition, infant baptism.