pejorative


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

pe·jor·a·tive

 (pĭ-jôr′ə-tĭv, -jŏr′-, pĕj′ə-rā′tĭv, pē′jə-)
adj.
Disparaging; belittling: "The label Neandertal took on a pejorative connotation decades ago; it implied boorishness at best and stupidity at worst" (Craig Stanford).
n.
A disparaging or belittling word or expression.

pe·jor′a·tive·ly adv.

pejorative

(pɪˈdʒɒrətɪv; ˈpiːdʒər-)
adj
(of words, expressions, etc) having an unpleasant or disparaging connotation
n
a pejorative word, expression, etc
[C19: from French péjoratif, from Late Latin pējōrātus, past participle of pējōrāre to make worse, from Latin pēior worse]
peˈjoratively adv

pe•jo•ra•tive

(pɪˈdʒɔr ə tɪv, -ˈdʒɒr-, ˈpɛdʒ əˌreɪ-, ˈpi dʒə-)

adj.
1. having a disparaging, derogatory, or belittling effect or force, as a word.
n.
2. a pejorative form or word, as poetaster.
[1880–85; < Late Latin pējōrāt(us), past participle of pējōrāre, derivative of pējor worse]
pe•jo′ra•tive•ly, adv.

pejorative

Used to describe an expression that means something unpleasant or derogatory.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pejorative - expressing disapproval; "dyslogistic terms like `nitwit' and `scalawag'"
uncomplimentary - tending to (or intended to) detract or disparage

pejorative

pejorative

adjective
Translations
pejorativnípejorativum
pejorativPejorativum
denigrerendkleinerendpejoratief
peiorativ

pejorative

[pɪˈdʒɒrətɪv] ADJpeyorativo, despectivo

pejorative

[pɪˈdʒɒrətɪv] adjpéjoratif/ive

pejorative

adj, pejoratively

pejorative

[pɪˈdʒɒrɪtɪv] adjspregiativo/a, peggiorativo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
The result says as much about how power works in society as it does about who chooses which pejorative label for whom in education.
Angry Karina Thompson said: "Faggot is a pejorative term for a gay man.
The chairman - former Home Office minister John Denham - accused Migration Watch of presenting immigration statistics in "the most sensational and pejorative ways".
IN response to those people who use the pejorative term "whingeing Scousers" to attack Liverpool folk who have the cheek to express their opinion.
Considered a pejorative in the 1940s, white military officers used the term to demean their black counterparts.
In fact, "reformism" in his vocabulary is rather pejorative.
Trying to keep up-to-date is the first step not on the way to wisdom but on the slide to oblivion--of being "history" in a pejorative sense.
Boulevard weaves actual slave histories into its tale of Newell's sexual awakening, while No Place refuses to shy away from its characters' learned racism and use of the pejorative nigger.
Although Rockwell was delighted to be called an "illustrator," that word in a serious art context has unfortunately always been a pejorative.
The Congolese called Baudouin "Mwana Kitoko" ("beautiful boy"), a pejorative nickname that his handlers quickly changed to "Bwana Kitoko," or "beautiful, noble man.
When I worked for him at Multinational Monitor, he'd use variations of the word "corporate" as a pejorative about six times every sentence.
In a recent article in The Weekly Standard, conservative lawyer and PBS hostproducer Hugh Hewitt repeated the error, adding a layer of pejorative language.