penchant

(redirected from penchants)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

pen·chant

 (pĕn′chənt)
n.
A definite liking; a strong inclination. See Synonyms at predilection.

[French, from present participle of pencher, to incline, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *pendicāre, from Latin pendēre, to hang; see (s)pen- in Indo-European roots.]

penchant

(ˈpɒŋʃɒŋ)
n
a strong inclination or liking; bent or taste
[C17: from French, from pencher to incline, from Latin pendēre to be suspended]

pen•chant

(ˈpɛn tʃənt; (esp. Brit.) Fr. pɑ̃ˈʃɑ̃)

n.
a strong inclination, taste, or liking for something.
[1665–75; < French, n. use of present participle of pencher to incline, lean < Vulgar Latin *pendicāre, derivative of Latin pendēre to hang]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.penchant - a strong likingpenchant - a strong liking; "my own preference is for good literature"; "the Irish have a penchant for blarney"
liking - a feeling of pleasure and enjoyment; "I've always had a liking for reading"; "she developed a liking for gin"
acquired taste - a preference that is only acquired after considerable experience; "martinis are an acquired taste"
weakness - a penchant for something even though it might not be good for you; "he has a weakness for chocolate"

penchant

penchant

noun
Translations

penchant

[ˌpɑ̃ːŋʃɑ̃ːŋ] Npredilección f (for por) → inclinación f (for hacia, por) to have a penchant fortener predilección por

penchant

[ˈpɒŋʃɒŋ] npenchant m
to have a penchant for sth → avoir un penchant pour qch

penchant

nSchwäche f(for für), Vorliebe f(for für)

penchant

[ˈpɒŋʃɒŋ] n (frm) → debole m, penchant m inv
References in classic literature ?
They were going from end to end of the country in all manner of useful missionary capacities; their penchant for wandering, and their experience in it, made them altogether the most effective spreaders of civilization we had.
Apparently Mademoiselle Violet combined a taste for philanthropy with her penchant for Islington dancing halls.
I remember, somewhere, sitting in a circle with Japanese fishermen, Kanaka boat-steerers from our own vessels, and a young Danish sailor fresh from cowboying in the Argentine and with a penchant for native customs and ceremonials.