penitent


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Related to penitent: Penitentes

pen·i·tent

 (pĕn′ĭ-tənt)
adj.
Feeling or expressing remorse for one's misdeeds or sins; contrite.
n.
1. One who is penitent.
2. A person performing penance under the direction of a confessor.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin pēnitēns, pēnitent-, from Latin paenitēns, present participle of paenitēre, to repent.]

pen′i·tent·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

penitent

(ˈpɛnɪtənt)
adj
feeling regret for one's sins; repentant
n
1. a person who is penitent
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity
a. a person who repents his sins and seeks forgiveness for them
b. RC Church a person who confesses his sins to a priest and submits to a penance imposed by him
[C14: from Church Latin paenitēns regretting, from paenitēre to repent, of obscure origin]
ˈpenitence, ˈpenitency n
ˈpenitently adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pen•i•tent

(ˈpɛn ɪ tənt)

adj.
1. feeling or expressing sorrow for sin or wrongdoing and disposed to atonement; repentant; contrite.
n.
2. a penitent person.
3. Rom. Cath. Ch. a person who confesses sin and submits to a penance.
[1325–75; Middle English < Medieval Latin pēnitent-, Latin paenitent- (s. of paenitēns), present participle of paenitēre to regret]
pen′i•tent•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.penitent - (Roman Catholic Church) a person who repents for wrongdoing (a Roman Catholic may be admitted to penance under the direction of a confessor)penitent - (Roman Catholic Church) a person who repents for wrongdoing (a Roman Catholic may be admitted to penance under the direction of a confessor)
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
religious person - a person who manifests devotion to a deity
flagellant - a person who whips himself as a religious penance
Adj.1.penitent - feeling or expressing remorse for misdeeds
ashamed - feeling shame or guilt or embarrassment or remorse; "are you ashamed for having lied?"; "felt ashamed of my torn coat"
regretful, sorry, bad - feeling or expressing regret or sorrow or a sense of loss over something done or undone; "felt regretful over his vanished youth"; "regretful over mistakes she had made"; "he felt bad about breaking the vase"
impenitent, unremorseful, unrepentant - not penitent or remorseful
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

penitent

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

penitent

adjective
1. Feeling or expressing regret for one's sins or misdeeds:
2. Expressing or inclined to express an apology:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

penitent

[ˈpenɪtənt]
A. ADJarrepentido (Rel) → penitente
B. Npenitente mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

penitent

[ˈpɛnɪtənt] adjrepentant(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

penitent

adjreuig (also Eccl), → zerknirscht
nBüßer(in) m(f); (Eccl) → reuiger Sünder, reuige Sünderin
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

penitent

[ˈpɛnɪtnt]
1. adjpentito/a
2. npenitente m/f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
A sublime one saw I to-day, a solemn one, a penitent of the spirit: Oh, how my soul laughed at his ugliness!
"And I you a happy New Year," responded the Second Blighted Being, with the accent of a penitent accordeon.
I shall relate my wrongs, the persecutions that I endure--I, a helpless mortal, a penitent, an unoffending poet!" Halpin Frayser was a poet only as he was a penitent: in his dream.
She now presented herself, with an elaborate apology, and with the nearest approach to a penitent expression of which her face was capable.
"Well, was it nice?" she asked, coming out to meet him with a penitent and meek expression.
She looks perfectly timid, dejected, and penitent. She is very pretty, though not so handsome as her mother, nor at all like her.
I come to you full of contrition, I am penitent. I make my confession.
Brooker died penitent. Sir Mulberry Hawk lived abroad for some years, courted and caressed, and in high repute as a fine dashing fellow.
On entering this holy place, the poor penitent was unable to shut the door so close as to prevent the passions he fled from entering with him.
At the same time I was genuinely touched and penitent, I used to shed tears and, of course, deceived myself, though I was not acting in the least and there was a sick feeling in my heart at the time....
Following this letter one of the Masonic Brothers whom Pierre respected less than the others forced his way in to see him and, turning the conversation upon Pierre's matrimonial affairs, by way of fraternal advice expressed the opinion that his severity to his wife was wrong and that he was neglecting one of the first rules of Freemasonry by not forgiving the penitent.
My state of depression would have gratified the most exacting of Methodists; and my penitent face would have made my fortune if I could only have been exhibited by a reformatory association on the platform of Exeter Hall.