penology

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pe·nol·o·gy

also poe·nol·o·gy  (pē-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study, theory, and practice of prison management and criminal rehabilitation.

[Latin poena, penalty (from Greek poinē; see kwei- in Indo-European roots) + -logy.]

pe′no·log′i·cal (pē′nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
pe′no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
pe·nol′o·gist n.

penology

(piːˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Sociology) the branch of the social sciences concerned with the punishment of crime
2. (Law) the science of prison management
Also called: poenology
[C19: from Greek poinē punishment]
penological adj
ˌpenoˈlogically adv
peˈnologist n

pe•nol•o•gy

(piˈnɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. the study of the punishment of crime.
2. the study of the management of prisons.
[1830–40; peno- (comb. form representing Greek poinḗ penalty) + -logy]
pe•no•log•i•cal (ˌpin lˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
pe•nol′o•gist, n.

penology

1. the science of the punishment of crime.
2. the science of the management of prisons. — penologist, n.
See also: Crime

penology

The study of the punishment of crime and prisons.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.penology - the branch of criminology concerned with prison management and prisoner rehabilitation
criminology - the scientific study of crime and criminal behavior and law enforcement
Translations

penology

[piːˈnɒlədʒɪ] Nciencia f penal, criminología f

penology

nKriminalpädagogik f
References in periodicals archive ?
With each case thoroughly vetted by penologists and psychologists, the roster is published in newspapers for transparency.
Home to a city jail since 1935, (4) Rikers was established as a progressive alternative to the notorious and discredited Welfare Island penal colony by a "dream team" of progressive penologists using much of the same language surrounding humanist penology we see around new jail construction today (J.
Early penologists in both Europe and the United States were
Penologists agree that discrimination is a justifiable argument against capital punishment since it is well known that some states have tailored capital punishment to fit the black offender.
Sentencing Commissioner Rachel Barkow and Professor Mark Osier--have recently argued that the best solution is to create a formal clemency board along the lines of the Sentencing Commission, consisting of judges, former prosecutors, defense counsel, penologists, religious authorities, and the like.
Both were beloved penologists 'who made prison life bearable.' The book is now out of print.
It discusses how Nazism helped institutionalize the correctional framework in Germany during the 20th century and how penologists created three pathways by sorting convicts based on moralizing social hygiene; the changing East German approaches to rehabilitation; how the German Democratic Republic dealt with sex offenders; how the Federal Republic established a correctional rehabilitation program; and how West Germany attempted to transform sex offenders into patients.
The contradictions between theories of modernity and punishment practices noted above have focused penologists' attention on the ways in which punishment is mediated by culture.
Epidemiologists will establish medical literature indicating how disease is transmitted in the prison context; penologists will speak to the viability of providing clean needles in prison, drawing on comparative evidence from other jurisdictions.
In 1970, a group of expert civilian penologists conducted a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of the Army Confinement System (ACS), which consisted of three tiers:
It was Brigadier General Crowder who, after lengthy consultation with sociologists and penologists, convinced the Army--and the Congress--to create the U.S.