penseroso

penseroso

(ˌpɛnsjɛˈrəʊsəʊ)
n, pl -sos
1. literary a pensive, brooding, or thoughtful person
2. archaic melancholy; a melancholic or brooding temperament or mood
adj
literary pensive; melancholy; brooding; thoughtful
[Italian]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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And before we can admire his great poem which he wrote later, we may love the beauty of L'Allegro, Il Penseroso, and Lycidas, which he wrote now.
L'Allegro and Il Penseroso are two poems which picture two moods in which the poet looks at life.
Il Penseroso pictures the thoughtful mood, or mood of gentle Melancholy.
The verse moves with even more stately measure than Il Penseroso.
"I apprehend your flute, which, by the by, I am glad to see you have brought, will be rather in the PENSEROSO style this evening, Mr.
In common with all the world, we have been much delighted with "The Shepherd's Hunting" by Withers--a poem partaking, in a remarkable degree, of the peculiarities of "Il Penseroso." Speaking of Poesy the author says:
'L'Allegro' and 'Il Penseroso' are idealized visions, in the tripping Elizabethan octosyllabic couplet, of the pleasures of suburban life viewed in moods respectively of light-hearted happiness and of reflection.
They include Rushneey River, Nortonthorpe Boy, Treaty Flyer and one that I have good cause to remember - Il Penseroso.
when Dorothy sat "in the window reading Milton's Penseroso to
Teskey deals at length with L'Allegro and Il Penseroso. He points out that both poems deal with the poet's life independent of family ties (or any ties).
Still, its melancholy does not surpass the milder forms of classical meditation on the "inevitable sadness of life," on the "pensiveness" which is directly linked with Milton's tradition (Il Penseroso).
Owing to his passion for the Italian culture and language, as testified by two collections of poems, L'Allegro and Il Penseroso published in 1631, as well as his deep indebtedness to Dante, who had had an enormous influence on him during his university studies, he soon travelled to Italy.