people of color


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people of color

n.
Plural of person of color.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.people of color - a race with skin pigmentation different from the white race (especially Blacks)
race - people who are believed to belong to the same genetic stock; "some biologists doubt that there are important genetic differences between races of human beings"
person of color, person of colour - (formal) any non-European non-white person
References in periodicals archive ?
Data collected by the CDI in 2017 showed that 80 percent of major insurers' governing board seats were held by men while just 12 percent were held by people of color. Of nearly 2,400 total board seats, only 14 members self-identified as LGBT, while 13 percent of insurance companies reported zero women and 35 percent reported zero persons of color on their boards, according to CDI data.
That is important in the field of dermatology because of the special skin, hair and nail considerations we need to understand knowing that we will be seeing a lot more people of color in our practices."
More than half of Atlanta residents are people of color according to the (https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/atlantacitygeorgia/RHI825217#RHI825217) U.S.
explore identity and correlates of community, examining the sense of belonging and sociopolitical involvement that queer people of color experience within their various communities.
But three-quarters of African Americans and 48 percent of Hispanics believe local news stories that involve people of color focus too much on negative stories.
The general managers who are people of color doubled last season from 10 percent (3 of 30) to 20 percent (6 of 30), which puts the NBA well ahead of other men's sports leagues.
For both people of color and their allies, this is a powerful offering that dismantles myths about polyamory and builds a bridge to better understanding.
The global list of invitees is 39 percent female and 30 percent people of color, as the academy responds to criticism that it was too white male.
Attacking Pulse was not just a single depraved act of violence; it was an existential attack on the entire LGBTQ community, particularly gay people of color. For time immemorial, violence and intimidation have been used to oppress and repress these communities.
"Black Prides allow people of color the chance to celebrate our culture and orientation without explanation," says LaToya Hankins, of North Carolina's Shades of Pride.
Susan Miller's Textual Carnivals began to break the model of a single male-dominated narrative of WPA work with her discussion of historiography and composition programs, but Miller herself admits that she did not create a space for people of color in the book (566) and therefore, despite its brilliance, Textual Carnivals does not acknowledge the strengths of presenting numerous administrative histories that may include experiences from people of color.