pepper-and-salt


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pep·per-and-salt

(pĕp′ər-ən-sôlt′)
adj.
Salt-and-pepper.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pepper-and-salt

adj
1. (Textiles) (of cloth) marked with a fine mixture of black and white
2. (of hair) streaked with grey
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pep′per-and-salt′



adj.
composed of a fine mixture of black and white or sometimes (in fabric) of two colors.
[1765–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pepper-and-salt - a fabric woven with flecks of light and dark
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

pepper-and-salt

[ˌpɛpərənˈsɔːlt] adj (hair) → brizzolato/a, sale e pepe inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The pair were oddly contrasted: the American very neat in his black coat and pepper-and-salt trousers, thin and dried-up, with something of ecclesiastical unction already in his manner; and the Englishman in his loose tweed suit, large-limbed and slow of gesture.
He deplored the American's black coat and pepper-and-salt trousers, and spoke with a scornful shrug of his New England conscience.
Lest anybody should feel a curiosity to know how Kit was clad, it may be briefly remarked that he wore no livery, but was dressed in a coat of pepper-and-salt with waistcoat of canary colour, and nether garments of iron-grey; besides these glories, he shone in the lustre of a new pair of boots and an extremely stiff and shiny hat, which on being struck anywhere with the knuckles, sounded like a drum.