percent sign


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Noun1.percent sign - a sign (`%') used to indicate that the number preceding it should be understood as a proportion multiplied by 100percent sign - a sign (`%') used to indicate that the number preceding it should be understood as a proportion multiplied by 100
grapheme, graphic symbol, character - a written symbol that is used to represent speech; "the Greek alphabet has 24 characters"
References in periodicals archive ?
This year's big moment of upheaval: The AP approvedthe use of the percent sign (i.e., 74%) instead of spelling out the word (74 percent).
HTTP:(FORWARD SLASH FORWARD SLASH)DCFPNAVYMIL.ORG(FORWARD SLASH) PERSONNEL(PERCENT SIGN)20PROTECTION(FORWARD SLASH)FLOATATION(PERCENT SIGN)20DEVICES(FORWARD SLASH)MK1(PERCENT SIGN)20ALL(FORWARD SLASH)MK-1INDEX.HTML 3.
A conservative rule of thumb: Add a percent sign to their age, then put no more than that percentage of their money into fixed income investments like bonds, fixed assets or CDs.
Offering an automatic upgrade to EoACAySageCover ExtraEoACAO - the enhanced version of the support service - for customers who sign up before December 31, 2010, the company is confident that the promotional upgrade will help achieve its goal of a near 100 percent sign up.
The percent sign (%) is, in reality, a unique way of writing 100.
It's the one with no dollar sign or percent sign attached, and it's the one that can make or break a hospital's success in its own community.
As for the rest, according to the National Association for Law Placement's figures for 1987, 7.9 percent go into business and industry, 12.1 percent sign on with the government, 12.5 percent accept judicial clerkships, and I percent go into academe.
a line that begins with a percent sign contains an identifying term followed by arbitrary text.
* 69 percent sign up because they help prevent missing payment due dates.
Some people should not be trusted with percent signs. A lower refund means the taxpayer received more in his paychecks--along with any raise he got.
The researchers found that 50 percent of PCPs in the active choice arm accessed the dashboard and only 6.3 percent signed prescription statin orders.