perceptually


Also found in: Medical.

per·cep·tu·al

 (pər-sĕp′cho͞o-əl)
adj.
Of, based on, or involving perception.

per·cep′tu·al·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.perceptually - with regard to perception; "this task is perceptually very difficult"
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References in periodicals archive ?
Yet no glossy document or sleek gathering can conceal the fact that what has been presented is a recycling of old ideas that are perceptually flawed and unimplementable.
Acoustic analysis provides a more objective and reliable measurement, which may be difficult to reliably document perceptually and may not be noticeable perceptually.
The most commonly used color spaces include the perceptually uniform CIEL*a*b (10-11), CIEL*u*v (12-13) and HSV (12-14) color spaces.
Mirroring nature, autonomous cars need to perceptually keep pace, in order to safely navigate the intricacies of urban life.
After 18 months, his voice was perceptually normalized, and voice measures were considerably improved (FO: 155 Hz; MPT: 18.2 s; frequency: 110 to 440 Hz; and intensity: 53 to 95 dB).
The argument from illusion attempts to establish the bold claim that we are never perceptually aware of ordinary material objects.
In this paper, we use a perceptually uniform and linear CIE La*b* color space for compression of images.
Perceptually, they kind of trick us into thinking they're not harming the planet, but the plastic is still there, just in tiny particles, or micro-plastics, which as we know is incredibly harmful to our ecosystem." While regular plastic bags take thousands of years to degrade completely, Sain Bags -- depending on the environmental condition -- biodegrade in three to six months, once they have been sent for composting.
Professor David Alais from the University of Sydney's school of psychology says the Yanny/Laurel sound is an example of a "perceptually ambiguous stimulus" such as the Necker cube or the face/vase illusion ."They can be seen in two ways, and often the mind flips back and forth between the two interpretations.
Among them was Professor David Alais from the University of Sydney's school of psychology who said hearing "Yanny" or "Laurel" depends on "perceptually ambiguous stimulus."
Explaining the audio-illusion, professor David Alais from the University of Sydney's school of psychology said the Yanny/Laurel sound is an example of a "perceptually ambiguous stimulus" such as the Necker cube or the face/vase illusion.
The exhibition promises to assemble exemplars from her early shaped canvases, freestanding sculptures, and light encasements made with Tesla-coil-based generators of Corse's own design, as well as of the nontechnological but still perceptually fugitive White Light paintings, begun in 1968, and the Black Earth works that she started after moving from downtown Los Angeles to Topanga Canyon in 1970.