perfect participle


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Related to perfect participle: past participle

perfect participle

perfect participle

n
(Grammar) another name for past participle

past′ par′ticiple



n.
a participle with past, perfect, or passive meaning, as fallen, sung, or defeated, used in English and other languages in forming the present perfect, past perfect, and passive and as an adjective.
[1790–1800]

perfect participle

Another word for past participle.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.perfect participle - a participle that expresses completed action
participial, participle - a non-finite form of the verb; in English it is used adjectivally and to form compound tenses
References in periodicals archive ?
[section]3.1 I will start by discussing the cakri-formations that correspond to what is expected of a perfect participle, i.e., the group in which there is a formal and functional correspondence between the two categories.
With regard to the perfect participle, it has been suggested that it is 'strongly adjectival' (Aerts 1965:13), but in general it is not considered adjectivised.
The perfect participle as well as gerund can also be translated in the past participle and often with a be-verb to make a passive construction.
Here, for "coactae," Marcel had read "coacta." Marcel's reading would thus have the adjectival perfect participle apply to "actio" instead of "qualitatis," so that, instead of "quality" having being concentrated ("qualitatis in angustum coactae"), the reference would have been to a concentrated action ("in angustum coacta ...
Generally, here the consonant s is not considered as a trace of the 3P personal suffix *-sV but as a trace of an old preterite (or of the perfect participle) suffix *-sV (Osnovy 1974 : 324).
So, tense-marked structures, that is, the form with the suffix -i (perfect participle form or third person singular agreement marking), is supposed to figure as a root infinitive in Greek as in (16).
This seems to be the interpretation given to the phrase by Michael Alexander, who translates the phrase 'when the beer was drunk'.(31) But the perfect participle of drincan is not passive at all, but active, as has often been noted: it means 'having drunk' rather than 'having been drunk'.
Second, the use of the nominative perfect participle as a substantive is rare in classical Latin and may occur only twice elsewhere in Horace (Carm.
As can be seen, many constructions occur infrequently: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] with present, aorist and perfect participle; ext with present and perfect participle; [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] with present participle; [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] with perfect participle and [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] with present and perfect participle.
Since the Tocharian PP is obviously cognate in its reduplication and endings with the perfect participle of the classical IE languages, the task is to explain how it came to be paired semantically with the preterite, which continues the PIE aorist--while the (proto-)perfect with *o ~ *[empty set] ablaut became one of the sources of the Tocharian subjunctive.
[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) is simply substantivazed perfect participle mertcem from mertcini 'to come into, to stick into'.
The oblique forms of the simple tenses of the indicative (present, imperfect and aorist) are formed as follows: the [??]-marker of the past participle is affixed to the imperfect stem, thus forming the imperfect participle ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) or to the aorist stem, forming the perfect participle ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).