perfect rhyme


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Related to perfect rhyme: half rhyme, slant rhyme

perfect rhyme

n.
1. Rhyme in which the final accented vowel and all succeeding consonants or syllables are identical, while the preceding consonants are different, for example, great, late; rider, beside her; dutiful, unbeautiful. Also called full rhyme, true rhyme.
2. Rime riche.

perfect rhyme

n
1. (Poetry) Also called: full rhyme rhyme between words in which the stressed vowels and any succeeding consonants are identical although the consonants preceding the stressed vowels may be different, as between part/hart or believe/conceive
2. (Poetry) a rhyme between two words that are pronounced the same although differing in meaning, as in bough/bow
Translations

perfect rhyme

References in periodicals archive ?
In the same way, you could argue that laureate is a perfect rhyme with the Nepalese word gloreat, which describes an unwanted build-up of mucus in a nose flute, and czhoreat which is Serbo-Croatian for antidisestablishmentarianism.
He further added, "This political apocalypse was going on in Europe and in America, and it found a perfect rhyme with what was going on in my own life.
Applesauce isn't a perfect rhyme of the others with its hissed-s rather than-z end sound but is throw in to represent nonsense and as a particular reference to Louis Phillips' long series of that name in Kickshaws.)
This latest book by Sharon Olds, Odes (a near perfect rhyme), contains sixty-four poems of praise.
I got a grant to write a new show at Joe's Pub--basically they were like, "Would you like a grant?" I was like, "Yeah!" Marc and Scott have this one rule: "Exact rhyme." They like everything to have a perfect rhyme, which is a real challenge for me, because I don't work with any rules.
It's important to get the perfect rhythm and the perfect rhyme in a children's book.
"I believe the most beautiful line of poetry that you can read is one that has perfect rhyme, form and meaning.
The "missing line" is not, after all, one written by Yeats: Vendler says that "We do not at first sense its lack because the first rhyme-word of the next quatrain, son, rhymes with John." Actually, Vendler's argument here would be better served by noticing that the two words are some way short of being a perfect rhyme; but the possibility remains that the lack "We ...
As well as endorsing his earlier model, their analysis suggested a fifth stage "for which the perfect rhyme could not be found".
Are you having trouble finding the perfect rhyme? Just type in a word and pick which syllable you are looking to rhyme with.
They not only make a perfect rhyme, but through consonance and assonance, they resonate in our imagination.
Where perfect rhyme does occur, however, it is all the more effective for its rarity.