perfect rhyme


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Related to perfect rhyme: half rhyme, slant rhyme

perfect rhyme

n.
1. Rhyme in which the final accented vowel and all succeeding consonants or syllables are identical, while the preceding consonants are different, for example, great, late; rider, beside her; dutiful, unbeautiful. Also called full rhyme, true rhyme.
2. Rime riche.

perfect rhyme

n
1. (Poetry) Also called: full rhyme rhyme between words in which the stressed vowels and any succeeding consonants are identical although the consonants preceding the stressed vowels may be different, as between part/hart or believe/conceive
2. (Poetry) a rhyme between two words that are pronounced the same although differing in meaning, as in bough/bow
Translations

perfect rhyme

References in periodicals archive ?
He further added, "This political apocalypse was going on in Europe and in America, and it found a perfect rhyme with what was going on in my own life.
Applesauce isn't a perfect rhyme of the others with its hissed-s rather than-z end sound but is throw in to represent nonsense and as a particular reference to Louis Phillips' long series of that name in Kickshaws.
They like everything to have a perfect rhyme, which is a real challenge for me, because I don't work with any rules.
It's important to get the perfect rhythm and the perfect rhyme in a children's book.
I believe the most beautiful line of poetry that you can read is one that has perfect rhyme, form and meaning.
As well as endorsing his earlier model, their analysis suggested a fifth stage "for which the perfect rhyme could not be found".
They not only make a perfect rhyme, but through consonance and assonance, they resonate in our imagination.
Where perfect rhyme does occur, however, it is all the more effective for its rarity.
Full or perfect rhyme occurs when differing consonant sounds are followed by identical, accented vowel sounds, and any sounds that may come after are also identical.
However, Staniforth is fairly close; he respects the scheme as much as Dale, though he is unafraid of assonance and pararhyme in place of perfect rhyme, not the case with Dale.
In Shapero's most memorable endings, her music gets impeccable--syntax winding up, meter evening out, perfect rhymes clicking into place--exactly when life starts to seem unfathomable.
Dickinson is famous for her off-rhymes: tomb/room and summer/ dollar are far from perfect rhymes.