performing


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Related to performing: norming

per·form

 (pər-fôrm′)
v. per·formed, per·form·ing, per·forms
v.tr.
1. To begin and carry through to completion; do: The surgeon performed the operation.
2. To take action in accordance with the requirements of; fulfill: perform one's contractual obligations.
3.
a. To enact (a feat or role) before an audience.
b. To give a public presentation of; present: My theater group performed a three-act play.
v.intr.
1. To function or accomplish something as expected or required: a car that performs well on curves; workers not performing up to standard.
2. To yield a return on investment: stocks that performed well.
3. To portray a role or demonstrate a skill before an audience: The juggler performed atop a unicycle.
4. To present a dramatic or musical work or other entertainment before an audience.

[Middle English performen, from Anglo-Norman performer, from Old French parfornir : par-, intensive pref. (from Latin per-, per-) + fournir, to furnish; see furnish.]

per·form′a·ble adj.
per·form′er n.
Synonyms: perform, execute, accomplish, achieve
These verbs signify to carry through to completion. To perform is to carry out an action, undertaking, or procedure, often with great skill or care. The ship's captain performed the wedding ceremony. Laser experiments are performed regularly in the laboratory.
Execute implies performing a task or putting something into effect in accordance with a plan or design: "To execute laws is a royal office; to execute orders is not to be a king" (Edmund Burke).
Accomplish connotes the successful completion of something, often of something that requires tenacity or talent: "Make one brave push and see what can be accomplished in a week" (Robert Louis Stevenson).
To achieve is to accomplish something, often something significant, especially despite difficulty: "Some are born great ... Some achieve greatness ... And some have greatness thrust upon them" (Shakespeare).

performing

(pəˈfɔːmɪŋ)
adj
(of an animal) trained to perform tricks before an audience, as in a circus

Performing


showmanship or any activity taking advantage of people’s credulity or desire for sensational entertainment, as practiced by P. T. Barnum (1810-91).
a participant in a noisy mock serenade, as a charivari.
a mock serenade accompanied by much noise and revelry, often played as a joke on newly married couples.
a strip tease dancer.
one who performs feats that require an unusual sense of balance, as a tightrope walker.
the art or technique of escaping from chains, locked trunks, etc., as a form of entertainment. — escapist, n., adj.
the art or skill of tightrope walking. — funambulist, n.
a performance involving Harlequin or other characters of the Commedia dell’Arte; hence, buffoonery or clownish behavior. Also called harlequinery.
a conjurer or magician who creates illusions, as by sleight of hand.
the art of the juggler.
skill in or practice of feats of dexterity that create a magical illusion. — legerdemainist, n.
the art or practice of copying or imitating closely, especially by a person for the purpose of entertainment. See also biology. — mimic, mimical, adj.
1. the art of performing monologues.
2. Obsolete, a monologue.
1. a performance by mummers, performers wearing masks or fantastic disguises.
2. any showy but empty performance.
the art of mute acting. — pantomimist, n.
a humorous performance at the piano, sometimes with a verbal accompaniment by the performer.
the art of legerdemain; sleight of hand. — prestidigitator, n.prestidigitatorial, prestidigitatory, adj.
the art of making and handling puppets.
a person who recites poetry or other literary excerpts for entertainment.
an image formed by a shadow cast upon a lighted surface, as one formed by the hands for entertainment. — shadowgraphist, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.performing - the performance of a part or role in a dramaperforming - the performance of a part or role in a drama
activity - any specific behavior; "they avoided all recreational activity"
personation, portrayal, characterization, enactment - acting the part of a character on stage; dramatically representing the character by speech and action and gesture
personation, impersonation - imitating the mannerisms of another person
method acting, method - an acting technique introduced by Stanislavsky in which the actor recalls emotions or reactions from his or her own life and uses them to identify with the character being portrayed
dumb show, pantomime, mime - a performance using gestures and body movements without words
byplay, stage business, business - incidental activity performed by an actor for dramatic effect; "his business with the cane was hilarious"
performance - the act of presenting a play or a piece of music or other entertainment; "we congratulated him on his performance at the rehearsal"; "an inspired performance of Mozart's C minor concerto"
skit - a short theatrical episode
hamming, overacting - poor acting by a ham actor
heroics - ostentatious or vainglorious or extravagant or melodramatic conduct; "heroics are for those epic films they make in Hollywood"
reenactment - performing a role in an event that occurred at an earlier time; "the reenactment of the battle of Princeton"
roleplaying - acting a particular role (as in psychotherapy)
performing arts - arts or skills that require public performance
Translations

performing

[pəˈfɔːmɪŋ]
A. ADJ [animal] → amaestrado
B. CPD performing arts NPLartes fpl de la interpretación

performing

[pərˈfɔːrmɪŋ] adj [animal] → savant(e)performing arts npl
the performing arts → les arts mpl du spectacle

performing

adj animaldressiert; artistdarstellend; the performing artsdie darstellenden Künste; performing rightsAufführungsrechte pl

performing

[pəˈfɔːmɪŋ] adj (animal) → ammaestrato/a
a performing seal → una foca ammaestrata
References in classic literature ?
It is also proper, that for performing these exercises the citizens should be divided into distinct classes, according to their ages, and that the young persons should have proper officers to be with them, and that the seniors should be with the magistrates; for having them before their eyes would greatly inspire true modesty and ingenuous fear.
The musicians took up a position inside, and were vigorously performing on their gongs, tam-tams, flutes, bones, tambourines, and immense drums.
A dozen of these sectaries of Tingou lay flat upon their backs, while others, dressed to represent lightning-rods, came and frolicked on their noses, jumping from one to another, and performing the most skilful leapings and somersaults.
Numerous cases could be given amongst the lower animals of the same organ performing at the same time wholly distinct functions; thus the alimentary canal respires, digests, and excretes in the larva of the dragon-fly and in the fish Cobites.
Students learn the dance from a technical standpoint, not a performing one.
Also performing will be country vocalist Sara Evans; Josh Gracin, a finalist in the second season of ``American Idol''; and Latino singers El Chapo de Sinaloa, with Jenni Rivera.
31, 2000 after performing a comprehensive review of a sample of audits of public companies by the then-eight largest audit firms.
Even in pieces written for elementary levels, students have the opportunity of performing music with greater harmonic color, musical depth, variety of sound, rhythmic complexities and contrapuntal interests, than what their abilities would allow if they would be performing a solo.
When performing synchronous replication, every write to primary storage is also captured in the secondary (replicated) storage.
3 THE KALANDUYAN FAMILY PERFORMING TRADITIONAL MAGUINDANAON KULINTANG GONG MUSIC (COTABATO CITY, MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES) I've been making my own field recordings of music performed by the family of my kulintang teacher, Danongan Kalanduyan, but other documentation is accessible at www.
THE AICPA REVISED ITS STANDARDS for performing and reporting on peer reviews for firms that do not audit SEC registrants.
After nearly 15 years of performing "deep tissue work" and other manipulations on patients, Hangarter developed tennis elbow, cervical disk disease and rotator cuff tendinitis.