perfuse


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per·fuse

 (pər-fyo͞oz′)
tr.v. per·fused, per·fus·ing, per·fus·es
1. To coat or permeate with liquid, color, or light; suffuse.
2. To pour or diffuse (a liquid, for example) over or through something.

[Latin perfundere, perfūs-, to pour over : per-, per- + fundere, to pour; see gheu- in Indo-European roots.]

per·fu′sive (pər-fyo͞o′sĭv, -zĭv) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

perfuse

(pəˈfjuːz)
vb (tr)
1. to suffuse or permeate (a liquid, colour, etc) through or over (something)
2. (Surgery) surgery to pass (a fluid) through organ tissue to ensure adequate exchange of oxygen and carbon monoxide
[C16: from Latin perfūsus wetted, from perfundere to pour over, from per- + fundere to pour]
perˈfused adj
perˈfusion n
perˈfusionist n
perˈfusive adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

per•fuse

(pərˈfyuz)

v.t. -fused, -fus•ing.
1. to overspread with moisture, color, etc.; suffuse.
2. to diffuse (a liquid, color, etc.) through or over something.
3. to pass (fluid) through blood vessels or the lymphatic system to an organ or tissue.
[1520–30; < Latin perfūsus, past participle of perfundere to drench, flood. See per-, fuse2]
per•fu′sion (-ˈfyu ʒən) n.
per•fu′sive (-sɪv) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

perfuse


Past participle: perfused
Gerund: perfusing

Imperative
perfuse
perfuse
Present
I perfuse
you perfuse
he/she/it perfuses
we perfuse
you perfuse
they perfuse
Preterite
I perfused
you perfused
he/she/it perfused
we perfused
you perfused
they perfused
Present Continuous
I am perfusing
you are perfusing
he/she/it is perfusing
we are perfusing
you are perfusing
they are perfusing
Present Perfect
I have perfused
you have perfused
he/she/it has perfused
we have perfused
you have perfused
they have perfused
Past Continuous
I was perfusing
you were perfusing
he/she/it was perfusing
we were perfusing
you were perfusing
they were perfusing
Past Perfect
I had perfused
you had perfused
he/she/it had perfused
we had perfused
you had perfused
they had perfused
Future
I will perfuse
you will perfuse
he/she/it will perfuse
we will perfuse
you will perfuse
they will perfuse
Future Perfect
I will have perfused
you will have perfused
he/she/it will have perfused
we will have perfused
you will have perfused
they will have perfused
Future Continuous
I will be perfusing
you will be perfusing
he/she/it will be perfusing
we will be perfusing
you will be perfusing
they will be perfusing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been perfusing
you have been perfusing
he/she/it has been perfusing
we have been perfusing
you have been perfusing
they have been perfusing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been perfusing
you will have been perfusing
he/she/it will have been perfusing
we will have been perfusing
you will have been perfusing
they will have been perfusing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been perfusing
you had been perfusing
he/she/it had been perfusing
we had been perfusing
you had been perfusing
they had been perfusing
Conditional
I would perfuse
you would perfuse
he/she/it would perfuse
we would perfuse
you would perfuse
they would perfuse
Past Conditional
I would have perfused
you would have perfused
he/she/it would have perfused
we would have perfused
you would have perfused
they would have perfused
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.perfuse - force a fluid through (a body part or tissue); "perfuse a liver with a salt solution"
flush - cause to flow or flood with or as if with water; "flush the meadows"
2.perfuse - cause to spread or flush or flood through, over, or across; "The sky was suffused with a warm pink color"
flush - cause to flow or flood with or as if with water; "flush the meadows"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It will be their job to cut the veins and arteries in the neck and insert cannulas - allowing the group to perfuse the head with the specialist antifreeze.
The products for heart preservation consist of a portable machine with associated sterile disposable products, as well as a patented innovative solution to perfuse and oxygenate the heart during transportation and preservation.
algorithms has become so perfuse that it has substituted the judgement
Therefore, it becomes more complicated for the bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) to enter the block and for the in vitro culture medium to perfuse into the central areas of the porous support (Vunjak-Novakovic et al., 1998; Holy et al., 2000; Wendt et al., 2003).
It could be assumed that the increased visceral fat directly effects LV output and stroke volume to perfuse the increased body mass.
At this stage, the spleen was connected to the circuit through the cannula that had been ligated to the main artery and the blood started to perfuse the spleen.
Madonna, under the care of four veterinary surgeons, survived a 90-minute operation, during which she was kept alive by having anaesthetic-infused water pumped through her mouth to perfuse her gills.
(5,6) Vasoactive drugs may be used to improve cerebral blood flow, particularly when cerebral vasospasm is suspected, to maintain a pressure gradient sufficient to perfuse the brain.
Impella heart pumps stabilize the patient's hemodynamics, unload the left ventricle, perfuse the end organs and promote recovery of the native heart.