perichoresis


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perichoresis

(ˌpɛrɪkɒˈriːsɪs)
n
(Theology) Christian theol the relationship between or interlinking of the three Persons of the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
That pilgrimage includes new creation of history and the cosmos, as Jong Chun Park puts it: "Korean Christian women, who decide to participate in the oikonomia of God who continues the new creation of history and the cosmos, are the ones who invite all of us to the trinitarian perichoresis of God for interliving.
The volume ends with reflections by Jurgen Moltmann, the well-known German "theologian of hope." His title, "God in the World-and the World in God" discusses what he names "Perichoresis in Trinity and Eschatology." By "perichoresis" he means God's indwelling in the Trinity, and he closes his words with the hope of God bringing the whole creation to its promised fullness.
Christ is "really present," and the Trinity's perichoresis is shared with creation.
The ecclesiology of communion and dialogue is, to the Orthodox Church, a trinitarian ecclesiology, based on the trinitarian extension of community: that is, on the unity-founded in conciliation, originality, and specificity--of sharing the "supreme love." (9) Church unity is, from this perspective, "a mutual exchange of various charismas in one and the same Spirit, and in one and the same faith, as in the Trinitarian perichoresis." (10)
The implications of the Trinity for the ecumenical context have been articulated with considerable focus on the notion of perichoresis. Meaning mutual interpenetration, the concept of perichoresis has aided the process of referring to the inter-relationship of the three persons of the Trinity.
Furthermore, God's unity is best seen as established in trinitarian perichoresis, the mutual interpenetration of the persons of the trinity.
Second is the perichoresis between the one church and the many churches, which, Massa contended, is a relation characteristic not of the church at its beginning but of the church in the period from Pentecost to Parousia.
seems to incorporate Mary into the perichoresis of the Trinity itself.
It is a mission grounded in trinitarian perichoresis. The Holy Trinity instructs us to behold and encounter God in creation.
Luther also occasionally used other images such as "union with God," perichoresis, the famous Eastern term, and others.
[T]o the intratrinitarian circumincessio corresponds an extratrinitarian perichoresis. (28)
described with the Eastern Orthodox notion of perichoresis, a word