perihelion

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perihelion

per·i·he·li·on

 (pĕr′ə-hē′lē-ən, -hēl′yən)
n. pl. per·i·he·li·a (-hē′lē-ə, -hēl′yə)
The point in a solar orbit where the orbiting body is closest to the sun.

[Alteration of New Latin perihēlium : peri- + Greek hēlios, sun; see sāwel- in Indo-European roots.]

per′i·he′li·al (-hē′lē-əl, -hēl′yəl) adj.

perihelion

(ˌpɛrɪˈhiːlɪən)
n, pl -lia (-lɪə)
(Astronomy) the point in its orbit when a planet or comet is nearest the sun. Compare aphelion
[C17: from New Latin perihēlium, from peri- + Greek hēlios sun]

per•i•he•li•on

(ˌpɛr əˈhi li ən, -ˈhil yən)

n., pl. -he•li•a (-ˈhi li ə, -ˈhil yə)
the point in the orbit of a planet or comet at which it is nearest to the sun.
[1660–70; < Greek peri- peri- + hḗli(os) sun + -on neuter n. ending, on the model of perigee; earlier in the New Latin form perihelium]
per`i•he′li•al, per`i•he′li•an, adj.
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perihelion

per·i·he·li·on

(pĕr′ə-hē′lē-ən)
The point nearest the sun in the orbit of a body, such as a planet or comet, that travels around the sun.

perihelion

the point in the orbit of a heavenly body where it is nearest the sun. Also called perihelium. See also aphelion.
See also: Planets
the point in the orbit of a heavenly body where it is nearest the sun. Also spelled perihelium. Cf. aphelion.
See also: Astronomy

perihelion

The point in a planet’s orbit at which it is closest to the Sun.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.perihelion - periapsis in solar orbitperihelion - periapsis in solar orbit; the point in the orbit of a planet or comet where it is nearest to the sun
periapsis, point of periapsis - (astronomy) the point in an orbit closest to the body being orbited
aphelion - apoapsis in solar orbit; the point in the orbit of a planet or comet that is at the greatest distance from the sun
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Perihelia Reduction and Global Kolmogorov Tori in the Planetary Problem
When we started to look at the orbits of these extreme objects, we noticed a strange resemblance: Although they have orbits wildly tilted out of the ecliptic plane, all their perihelia lie near where their orbits cross the ecliptic moving from south to north.