peritonsillar


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Related to peritonsillar: peritonsillar abscess
Translations

per·i·ton·sil·lar

a. periamigdalino-a, que rodea o está cerca de una amígdala.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our exclusion criteria included severe unilateral tonsil enlargement concerning for neoplasia, a history of peritonsillar abscess, a bleeding disorder, and simultaneous septoplasty or sleep apnea surgery.
All patients above 4 years regardless of gender presenting with complaints of recurrent tonsillitis, Obstructive sleep apnea, history of peritonsillar abscess and suspected malignancy were included in the study.
Comparison of intravenous and peritonsillar infiltration of tramadol for postoperative pain relief in children following adenotonsillectomy.
Objective: Smartphone-based thermal imaging was evaluated for its utility in the detection of peritonsillar abscesses.
Some of the pathological processes that can occur within this space include malignant tumors, inflammatory lesions, infectious causes (tonsillar or peritonsillar abscess) and musculoskeletal tumors (Figures 1B, 2).
Peritonsillar abscesses (PTA) are the most common deep neck space infection and are a common complication of tonsillitis with potentially disastrous sequelae.
Relative indications for surgery include recurrent episodes of tonsillitis requiring hospitalisation, peritonsillar abscess, febrile seizures, orthodontic concerns or malocclusion, tonsilliths, halitosis, family history of rheumatic heart disease or glomerulonephritis, and tonsillar asymmetry (to exclude malignancy on histological specimen).
Patients with superficial infections, limited intraoral abscesses, peritonsillar abscesses or cervical necrotising fasciitis alone, infections due to penetrating neck trauma and head and neck malignancies and their treatment complications.
64,65) As described previously, most patients do not require reconstruction as long as the resection is limited to the tonsillar fossa and directly adjacent peritonsillar regions; however, free tissue transfer may be necessary in the case of carotid artery exposure and in patients with poor wound healing.
Bacterium of the Streptococcus species most often causes this primary pharyngitis, which then leads to peritonsillar cellulitis and/or abscess.
Brain abscess from a peritonsillar abscess in an immunocompetent child: a case report and review of the literature.