pejorative

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pe·jor·a·tive

 (pĭ-jôr′ə-tĭv, -jŏr′-, pĕj′ə-rā′tĭv, pē′jə-)
adj.
Disparaging; belittling: "The label Neandertal took on a pejorative connotation decades ago; it implied boorishness at best and stupidity at worst" (Craig Stanford).
n.
A disparaging or belittling word or expression.

pe·jor′a·tive·ly adv.

pejorative

(pɪˈdʒɒrətɪv; ˈpiːdʒər-)
adj
(of words, expressions, etc) having an unpleasant or disparaging connotation
n
a pejorative word, expression, etc
[C19: from French péjoratif, from Late Latin pējōrātus, past participle of pējōrāre to make worse, from Latin pēior worse]
peˈjoratively adv

pe•jo•ra•tive

(pɪˈdʒɔr ə tɪv, -ˈdʒɒr-, ˈpɛdʒ əˌreɪ-, ˈpi dʒə-)

adj.
1. having a disparaging, derogatory, or belittling effect or force, as a word.
n.
2. a pejorative form or word, as poetaster.
[1880–85; < Late Latin pējōrāt(us), past participle of pējōrāre, derivative of pējor worse]
pe•jo′ra•tive•ly, adv.

pejorative

Used to describe an expression that means something unpleasant or derogatory.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pejorative - expressing disapproval; "dyslogistic terms like `nitwit' and `scalawag'"
uncomplimentary - tending to (or intended to) detract or disparage

pejorative

pejorative

adjective
Translations
pejorativnípejorativum
pejorativPejorativum
denigrerendkleinerendpejoratief
peiorativ

pejorative

[pɪˈdʒɒrətɪv] ADJpeyorativo, despectivo

pejorative

[pɪˈdʒɒrətɪv] adjpéjoratif/ive

pejorative

adj, pejoratively

pejorative

[pɪˈdʒɒrɪtɪv] adjspregiativo/a, peggiorativo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
But that label didn't last long and the perjorative 'Pajero' became his legacy.
(52.) Robertson II, supra note 20, at 150-51 ("The term 'quality control' sounds perjorative [sic], but it is the parents' interest in healthy offspring that has spurred these developments.").
The very term "golden leash" is said to be "perjorative." Gelles, infra note 142.
He even provides a glossary of key terms for the reader which references Nubian mythology, such as the distinction between adamir (humans), amon dugur (the evil inhabitants of the Nile), and amon nutto (the good inhabitants of the river); aspects of daily life including food, drink, and clothing; and certain, often symbolic, terms such as gorbatH-ya, "a perjorative term for anything not Nubian" which roughly means ajnabil-ya (foreigner) and ibiyu, "an exclamation in response to tragedy," the equivalent of ya wayli in Arabic, as well as the substitution of Nubian for basic Arabic expressions such as mas kag ru instead of marhaban (Hello) (121).
All that has helped create a culture of hostility towards a solid rearguard and made the word "defensive" a perjorative.
And he would know, having ended up in the headlines earlier this year for his use of perjorative terms like 'n***' during a routine at the Professional Footballers' Association annual awards dinner in London, resulting in the players' union demanding his reported five-figure fee be returned.
"Nimbyism" I would suggest therefore needs to flourish and be encouraged in North Wales on this issue and not dismissed in the perjorative way Ann Jones suggests.
While she says she created it to "stop the use of the perjorative [sic] term 'nonclassical'," I find the term, imprecise, insulting, and even more pejorative than the quite acceptable "nonclassical."
Nownow didn't appreciate the raised tempers and perjorative language in the debate: "The use of such buzz words as NIMBY helps no one and sets the situation up for a battle royal....Let battle commence.
Having accurate information is essential, as is the avoidance of using perjorative terms such as "misdemeanor".
Oeij-Se (Thio 59) in the same story refers to Vigni, the Dutchman as pe kau, a Chinese (Minnanyu) perjorative term meaning "white monkey." Gouda (18) claims that the Dutch colonialists had deliberately rearranged the native traditional customs that ensured the profitability of their exploitation of the natives.