permissiveness


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per·mis·sive

 (pər-mĭs′ĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Granting or inclined to grant permission; tolerant or lenient: permissive parents.
b. Characterized by freedom of personal behavior or a disregard of traditional social mores.
2. Permitted or optional: permissive uses of funds.
3. Biology Supporting viral replication. Used of a cell.

per·mis′sive·ly adv.
per·mis′sive·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.permissiveness - a disposition to allow freedom of choice and behaviorpermissiveness - a disposition to allow freedom of choice and behavior
disposition, temperament - your usual mood; "he has a happy disposition"
toleration, sufferance, acceptance - a disposition to tolerate or accept people or situations; "all people should practice toleration and live together in peace"
indulgence, lenience, leniency - a disposition to yield to the wishes of someone; "too much indulgence spoils a child"
overtolerance - too much permissiveness
unpermissiveness, restrictiveness - a lack of permissiveness or indulgence and a tendency to confine behavior within certain specified limits
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

permissiveness

[pəˈmɪsɪvnɪs] Npermisividad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

permissiveness

nNachgiebigkeit f, → Permissivität f (geh); (of age, attitude, law, parents, school)Freizügigkeit f; (sexually) → Freizügigkeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

permissiveness

[pəˈmɪsɪvnɪs] npermissività
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
TABLE 1 Substance Abuse Attitudes Survey (SAAS) Subscale Scores Variable Pre-Test Post-Test Effect size Permissiveness 45.11 42.57 0.27 Non-stereotyping 49.27 50.81 Treatment Intervention 44.30 47.70 0.31 Treatment Optimism 48.14 50.27 Non-moralism 47.46 47.68 Variable Significance Permissiveness * Yes: t(36) = 2.53, p = 0.008 Non-stereotyping No Treatment Intervention * Yes: t(36) = 2.52, p = 0.008 Treatment Optimism No Non-moralism No Note.
Loose (permissiveness) or very strict atmosphere at home.
Its vulnerabilities and strengths are at one in its sheer permissiveness. By all measures, this German artist's shadow is long, so some goodly anticipation surrounds what will be his first career survey in Austria.
Foreign Minister of Kyrgyzstan Ruslan Kazakbaev stressed the need to observe the line between respect for human rights in the country and interference in its internal affairs, as well as the balance between the "right to the right" and permissiveness, speaking at the 19th session of UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on February 29.
For Gaga,themantra this wayisnothingmore convenient sloganor wordstojustify anarchy sexual permissiveness. Fromtheself-centred she wears to the artificial self-esteemsheexudesinsong, LadyGaga stands everythingthat is America.
And while hyper-networking and hyper-texting were both highly related to health risks, hyper-networkers were at especially high risk for stress, depression, suicide, substance use, fighting, poor sleep, poor academic performance, high television viewing and parental permissiveness.
The findings of Study 1 indicated that, consistent with previous research, participants overestimated the sexual activity and permissiveness of their peers and thus perceived self-other discrepancies.
Despite being in the middle of such a liberal decade, she campaigned relentlessly against the permissiveness of the time.
While much of the Protestant world later followed it in this respect, it proved to be the first overthrow of many other moral principles, leading to moral permissiveness in general.
Professor Hans Eysenk, the eminent child psychologist said in 1972: "If television advertising is effective and there is little doubt that it is, why should television advertising be less effective when it advertises sexual depravity, gratuitous violence and permissiveness generally." Common sense tells us that visual images, used as they are in the education and training processes, affect people and their behaviour patterns.
These researchers developed the Sexual Attitudes Scale (SAS) which explores four factors of sexual attitudes such as permissiveness (e.g., how casual a person might be about sex), sexual practices (e.g., belief in sex education for young people), communion (e.g., what does sex communicate to the partner), and instrumentality (e.g., the purpose of sex).
(4) A second was the rising pressure of greater permissiveness and the loosening of social mores, itself associated with the growth of a youth-based consumer culture of pleasure and entertainment.