perpetuity

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per·pe·tu·i·ty

 (pûr′pĭ-to͞o′ĭ-tē, -tyo͞o′-)
n. pl. per·pe·tu·i·ties
1. The quality or condition of being perpetual: "The perpetuity of the Church was an article of faith" (Morris L. West).
2. Time without end; eternity.
3. Law
a. The condition of an estate that is limited so as to be inalienable either perpetually or longer than the period determined by law.
b. An estate so limited.
4. An annuity payable indefinitely.
Idiom:
in perpetuity
For an indefinite period of time; forever.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

perpetuity

(ˌpɜːpɪˈtjuːɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. eternity
2. the state or quality of being perpetual
3. (Law) property law a limitation preventing the absolute disposal of an estate for longer than the period allowed by law
4. (Banking & Finance) an annuity with no maturity date and payable indefinitely
5. in perpetuity for ever
[C15: from Old French perpetuite, from Latin perpetuitās continuity; see perpetual]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

per•pe•tu•i•ty

(ˌpɜr pɪˈtu ɪ ti, -ˈtyu-)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state or character of being perpetual.
2. endless or indefinitely long duration or existence.
3. an annuity paid for life.
[1375–1425; late Middle English perpetuite < Latin perpetuitās. See perpetual, -ity]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.perpetuity - the property of being perpetual (seemingly ceaseless)
permanence, permanency - the property of being able to exist for an indefinite duration
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

perpetuity

noun
in perpetuity for ever, for good, permanently, for keeps (informal), for all time, for eternity, for always The US Government gave the land to the tribe in perpetuity.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

perpetuity

noun
2. The totality of time without beginning or end:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

perpetuity

[ˌpɜːpɪˈtjuːɪtɪ] Nperpetuidad f
in perpetuitya perpetuidad
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

perpetuity

[ˌpɜːrpɪˈtjuːɪti] n
in perpetuity → à perpétuité
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

perpetuity

n (form)Ewigkeit f; in perpetuityauf ewig; (Jur) → lebenslänglich
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

perpetuity

[ˌpɜːpɪˈtjuːɪtɪ] n in perpetuityin perpetuo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Barton Leach, Perpetuities: New Absurdity, Judicial and Statutory Correctives, 73 Harv.
Assume the existence of two types of perpetuities. Both types pay $1, before taxes, each year, but the income from one type is tax-exempt, and the income from the other type is taxable.
The new trust's terms do not postpone the vesting of trust principal beyond the perpetuities period applicable to the original trust.
First, the Act eliminates the rule against perpetuities; a trust under Alaska law can continue for successive generations and thereby reduce estate taxes.
The common law rule against perpetuities (which limits the life of a trust) is often repealed by these jurisdictions.
A Short & Happy Guide to the Rule: The Little Book on Perpetuities
The terms of the appointees power of appointment do not preclude the appointee from exercising his power in a way that extends the perpetuities period applicable to the trust assets, i.e., that postpones the date on which the trust property vests in possession.
It does not cover advanced topics like personal property rules, equitable estates, marital estates, concurrent estates, lapse, trusts, adoption, the Rule in Clobberie's Case, or the more sophisticated or collateral rules for construction of ambiguous conveyances (such as implied conditions of survivorship) or for perpetuities (such as infectious invalidity and the validity of charitable gifts).
The technical language of the cases, especially the older property and trust precedents, is inaccessible to readers lacking expertise in ancient rules of law, some of which are now only selectively taught in law schools, e.g., the law of mortmain and the rule against perpetuities.
A few states have eliminated the rule against perpetuities.
We propose and analyze an algorithm to approximate distribution functions and densities of perpetuities. Our algorithm refines an earlier approach based on iterating discretized versions of the fixed point equation that defines the perpetuity.