persecute

(redirected from persecutors)
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persecute

hound; afflict; torture; torment; badger; bother: persecute the opposition
Not to be confused with:
prosecute – to institute legal proceedings against: prosecute the suspect; carry forward something begun: prosecute a war
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

per·se·cute

 (pûr′sĭ-kyo͞ot′)
tr.v. per·se·cut·ed, per·se·cut·ing, per·se·cutes
1. To oppress or harass with ill-treatment, especially because of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or beliefs.
2. To annoy persistently; bother: persecuted the babysitter with foolish questions.

[Middle English, from Old French persecuter, back-formation from persecuteur, persecutor, from Late Latin persecūtor, from persecūtus, past participle of persequī, to persecute, from Latin, to pursue : per-, per- + sequī, to follow; see sekw- in Indo-European roots.]

per′se·cu·tee′ (-kyo͞o-tē′) n.
per′se·cu′tive, per′se·cu·to′ry (-kyo͝o-tôr′ē, -kyo͞o′tə-rē) adj.
per′se·cu′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

persecute

(ˈpɜːsɪˌkjuːt)
vb (tr)
1. to oppress, harass, or maltreat, esp because of race, religion, etc
2. to bother persistently
[C15: from Old French persecuter, back formation from persecuteur, from Late Latin persecūtor pursuer, from persequī to take vengeance upon]
ˈperseˌcutive adj
ˈperseˌcutor n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

per•se•cute

(ˈpɜr sɪˌkyut)

v.t. -cut•ed, -cut•ing.
1. to subject to harassing or cruel treatment, as because of religion, race, or beliefs; oppress.
2. to annoy or trouble persistently.
[1400–50; back formation from persecutour persecutor (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin persecūtor orig. prosecutor = Latin persecū-, variant s. of persequī to prosecute, pursue closely (see per-, sequence) + -tor -tor]
per′se•cu`tive, adj.
per′se•cu`tor, n.
per′se•cu`to•ry (-ˌkyu tə ri, -kyəˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

persecute

prosecute
1. 'persecute'

To persecute someone means to continually treat them badly and make them suffer, for example because of their political or religious beliefs.

Members of these sects are ruthlessly persecuted.
They claim that nobody is persecuted for religious belief.
2. 'prosecute'

To prosecute someone means to accuse them of a crime and bring criminal charges against them.

He was prosecuted for drunken driving.
Trespassers will be prosecuted.
Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012

persecute


Past participle: persecuted
Gerund: persecuting

Imperative
persecute
persecute
Present
I persecute
you persecute
he/she/it persecutes
we persecute
you persecute
they persecute
Preterite
I persecuted
you persecuted
he/she/it persecuted
we persecuted
you persecuted
they persecuted
Present Continuous
I am persecuting
you are persecuting
he/she/it is persecuting
we are persecuting
you are persecuting
they are persecuting
Present Perfect
I have persecuted
you have persecuted
he/she/it has persecuted
we have persecuted
you have persecuted
they have persecuted
Past Continuous
I was persecuting
you were persecuting
he/she/it was persecuting
we were persecuting
you were persecuting
they were persecuting
Past Perfect
I had persecuted
you had persecuted
he/she/it had persecuted
we had persecuted
you had persecuted
they had persecuted
Future
I will persecute
you will persecute
he/she/it will persecute
we will persecute
you will persecute
they will persecute
Future Perfect
I will have persecuted
you will have persecuted
he/she/it will have persecuted
we will have persecuted
you will have persecuted
they will have persecuted
Future Continuous
I will be persecuting
you will be persecuting
he/she/it will be persecuting
we will be persecuting
you will be persecuting
they will be persecuting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been persecuting
you have been persecuting
he/she/it has been persecuting
we have been persecuting
you have been persecuting
they have been persecuting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been persecuting
you will have been persecuting
he/she/it will have been persecuting
we will have been persecuting
you will have been persecuting
they will have been persecuting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been persecuting
you had been persecuting
he/she/it had been persecuting
we had been persecuting
you had been persecuting
they had been persecuting
Conditional
I would persecute
you would persecute
he/she/it would persecute
we would persecute
you would persecute
they would persecute
Past Conditional
I would have persecuted
you would have persecuted
he/she/it would have persecuted
we would have persecuted
you would have persecuted
they would have persecuted
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.persecute - cause to suffer; "Jews were persecuted in the former Soviet Union"
bedevil, dun, rag, torment, frustrate, crucify - treat cruelly; "The children tormented the stuttering teacher"
purge - oust politically; "Deng Xiao Ping was purged several times throughout his lifetime"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

persecute

verb
2. harass, bother, annoy, bait, tease, worry, hassle (informal), badger, pester, vex, be on your back (slang) He described his first wife as constantly persecuting him.
harass let alone, leave alone
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

persecute

verb
To do a wrong to; treat unjustly:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يَضْطَهِدُيَضْطَهِد، يُعَذِّب
pronásledovat
forfølgeretsforfølge
vainota
progoniti
ofsækja
迫害する
박해하다
persekiotojas
vajāt
preganjati
förfölja
จับมาลงโทษ
baskı yapmakeziyet etmekzulmetmek
ngược đãi

persecute

[ˈpɜːsɪkjuːt] VTperseguir; (= harass) → acosar
they were persecuted under the Nazissufrieron persecución bajo los nazis
to persecute sb with questionsacosar a algn con preguntas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

persecute

[ˈpɜːrsɪkjuːt] vtpersécuter
to be persecuted → être persécuté
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

persecute

vtverfolgen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

persecute

[ˈpɜːsɪkjuːt] vtperseguitare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

persecute

(ˈpəːsikjuːt) verb
to make (someone) suffer, especially because of their opinions or beliefs. They were persecuted for their religion.
ˌperseˈcution noun
ˈpersecutor noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

persecute

يَضْطَهِدُ pronásledovat retsforfølge verfolgen διώκω perseguir vainota persécuter progoniti perseguitare 迫害する 박해하다 vervolgen forfølge prześladować perseguir преследовать förfölja จับมาลงโทษ baskı yapmak ngược đãi 迫害
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
The Goods wafted themselves to heaven and asked for a righteous vengeance on their persecutors. They entreated Jupiter that they might no longer be associated with the Ills, as they had nothing in common and could not live together, but were engaged in unceasing warfare; and that an indissoluble law might be laid down for their future protection.
The victims of persecution had now turned persecutors on their own account, and persecutors of the most terrible description.
He knocked again, harder than before, for behind him he heard the steps and the labored breathing of his persecutors. The same silence followed.
Chadband is attached to no particular denomination and is considered by his persecutors to have nothing so very remarkable to say on the greatest of subjects as to render his volunteering, on his own account, at all incumbent on his conscience; but he has his followers, and Mrs.
The historian of the sect affirms that, by the wrath of Heaven, a blight fell upon the land in the vicinity of the "bloody town" of Boston, so that no wheat would grow there; and he takes his stand, as it were, among the graves of the ancient persecutors, and triumphantly recounts the judgments that overtook them, in old age or at the parting hour.
But insensibly all fears were dispersed; the surintendant, by hard traveling, placed such a distance between himself and his persecutors, that no one of them could reasonably be expected to overtake him.
He tore his way through his persecutors, flinging one of them clear over the parapet; he bowled a horse and his rider down, and plunged straight for the next, got home with his horns, wounding both horse and man; on again, here and there and this way and that; and one after another he tore the bowels out of two horses so that they gushed to the ground, and ripped a third one so badly that although they rushed him to cover and shoved his bowels back and stuffed the rents with tow and rode him against the bull again, he couldn't make the trip; he tried to gallop, under the spur, but soon reeled and tottered and fell, all in a heap.
I laid some stress upon the kindness which the viceroy of Tigre had shown to us, and in particular to me; but was soon convinced that those hopes had no real foundation, for he was one of the most violent of our persecutors. He seized upon all our lands, and, advancing with his troops to Fremona, blocked up the town.
"Madam, you could not remain in India, and your safety could only be assured by bringing you to such a distance that your persecutors could not take you."
Their persecutors were sentenced to long terms in prison, where they were harshly treated; while no man, not a member of the favored unions, was permitted to carry weapons.
He hid his face in his burning hands, and feebly bemoaned his own weakness, and the cruelty of his persecutors. A short pause, and he shouted out a few doggerel rhymes--the last he had ever learned.
A while we must leave Tom in the hands of his persecutors, while we turn to pursue the fortunes of George and his wife, whom we left in friendly hands, in a farmhouse on the road-side.