hot link

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hot link

n
1. (Computer Science) a word or phrase in a hypertext document that when selected by mouse or keyboard causes information that has been associated with that word or phrase to be displayed. See hypertext
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We embedded some of these visualizations into course LibGuides, while others remained in the Tableau Public account dashboard and were shared using a persistent link.
AdTruth Resolve represents another milestone in Experian Marketing Services long-term strategy to provide marketers with a ubiquitous, consistent and persistent link across all channels as part of the Experian Marketing Suite.
Users can create a persistent link that they can use to retrieve the complete Voyant Tools dashboard and the corpus they are analyzing at a later time.
Have a persistent link to the community in the main navigation of your Web sites.
It is neither the persistent link to the article nor the URL from the location bar.
Anthropologists long ago pointed out the persistent link between language and magic, but have tended to confine their discussions to "primitive" cultures, usually located in remote corners of the globe.
Leicester and Stade Francais have been mentioned in dispatches as a possible destination for the centre, but the strongest and most persistent link appears to be with Heineken Cup holders Toulouse.
When radiologists identified the need to view old history as a persistent link to our film system, the hospital's IT team and GE engineers designed a solution.
However, the author's modesty in limiting the conclusions he draws by stopping short of wider secondary reference is regrettable, since interesting issues, such as the persistent link which the texts make between art and death, or the light they may cast on contemporary notions of masculinity, are thus left uncommented.
Like Fischer, whose influence is clearly seen on this book, Cowing's transatlantic study shows a persistent link between old England and modern America.
Starting with the Groysser Kundes, a weekly of Yiddish jokes and cartoons that ran from 1909 to 1927, Buhle describes the persistent link between sitcom humor, graphic art and radical sentiment that finds its way into the comics of Pekar and Spiegelman.

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