personalism


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per·son·al·ism

(pûr′sə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The quality of being characterized by purely personal modes of expression or behavior; idiosyncrasy.
2. Philosophy Any of various theories regarding the person or personality as the key to the interpretation of reality.

per′son·al·ist adj. & n.
per′son·al·is′tic adj.

personalism

(ˈpɜːsənəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) a philosophical movement that stresses the value of persons
2. an idiosyncratic mode of behaviour or expression
ˌpersonalˈistic adj
ˈpersonalist n, adj

personalism

the individual or personal characteristics of a person or object. — personalist, n. — personalistic, adj.
See also: Self
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dietrich von Hildebrand's treatise, The Nature of Love, is set in relation to the theological personalism of the Cappadocian fathers of the Church, and to my own earlier work done in this tradition.
Adapting the methodology of what Professor Holloway calls a new history of religions perspective, he attends carefully to the religious topoi of Philippians, especially the metamorphic myth in chapter 2, and draws significant conclusions about Paul's personalism and "mysticism".
First, there is nothing wrong with our culture of personalism.
These four principles, organized and presented in Michael Fogarty's classic work Christian Democracy in Western Europe, 1820-1953, are personalism, solidarity, subsidiarity, and vertical pluralism.
Lee's central argument is that whereas personalism within the armed forces creates apt conditions for the defection of disaffected senior officers, military defection is unlikely to occur in non-personalistic authoritarian regimes where the armed forces are more likely to put down popular demonstrations.
Lee asserts that an authoritarian regime's capacity to survive popular protests rests on two factors: a lack of personalism among its leaders and, as a consequence, the support of the nation's military forces.
His principal goal is a profound knowledge of the human person, and his anthropology is neither essentialist nor existentialist but combines both in a personalism based on realist metaphysics and phenomenology.
Personalism places persons and personal relationships at the focal point of theories and practices.
Gifford's third chapter, "Authority's Apocalypse: Theories of Personalism," revisits Marxist assertions that anarchism is a "bourgeois individualist" ideology, a misrepresentation underpinning Jameson's claim that Late Modernists are boxed into ineffectual processes of "self-consciousness, reflexivity and irony or self-reference" divorced from any "revolutionary transmutation of the world of actuality itself" (Gifford 154) and one that figures as well in David Weir's naive reading of contemporary anarchism as a cultural variant of postmodern capitalism (Gifford 157).
Lee boils the answer down to what he calls increased personalism of the autocrat as well as within the Philippine and Indonesian militaries.
Osis defined personalism as a worldview whereby the subject assumes a critical point of view and comes to a new understanding of cognition.
He examines how the Personalism of anarcho-anti-authoritarian contemporaries such as Alex Comfort, Robert Duncan, Lawrence Durrell, J.