personalism

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per·son·al·ism

(pûr′sə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The quality of being characterized by purely personal modes of expression or behavior; idiosyncrasy.
2. Philosophy Any of various theories regarding the person or personality as the key to the interpretation of reality.

per′son·al·ist adj. & n.
per′son·al·is′tic adj.

personalism

(ˈpɜːsənəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) a philosophical movement that stresses the value of persons
2. an idiosyncratic mode of behaviour or expression
ˌpersonalˈistic adj
ˈpersonalist n, adj

personalism

the individual or personal characteristics of a person or object. — personalist, n. — personalistic, adj.
See also: Self
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References in periodicals archive ?
To observers and Chinese intellectuals, however, the news is reminiscent of the personalist style of Mao Zedong, the nation's autocratic founder whose rule became synonymous with economic and social upheaval.
Wouldn't it be smoother and faster if Hun Sen simply enshrines a personalist dictatorship into power?
It explains how the first period modernized probation services and the criminal justice system, while the second transformed them; applies theories of Durkheim, Weber, Marx, and Foucault to these developments, as well as the conceptual framework of Lacan and Zizek; discusses the religious and personalist tradition in the context of moral economy and the relationship to prison reform; applies social theory and moral sensibilities to the themes of modernization and transformation; applies social theories and the religious, personalist, and moral economy concepts to understand probation, criminal justice, and penal policy since 1997; and discusses the views of solicitors, clerks, magistrates, barristers, and judges.
He speculates that conditions that did not apply in Asia, such as ethnic factionalism, may have allowed for personalist dictators, like Basilar al-Assad in Syria, to maintain the military's loyalty, which has allowed them to avoid transitioning toward democracy even in the face of widespread protests.
After the introduction, Chapter 1 proceeds to "de-tropicalize" the Trujillo dictatorship and Dominican masculinity, proposing that the Trujilllato's hegemonic notions of masculinity were not only influenced by the Latin American idea of the personalist caudillo, but also by imperialist ideas in the United States.
If personalist dictators have high levels of discretion over appointments and deployment in the military, it is not clear why marginalized officers would have the power to decisively withhold coercive power during the protests.
This personalist approach is at the core of traditional Judeo-Christian teaching.
This article presents an ethical analysis and critique of personalized service in the tradition of Catholic social teaching (CST) that is both Catholic and Personalist.
demonstrates his sympathy for Smith in his detailed exposition of key concepts about which he had written books (such as the personalist approach to religious life that puts faith at its center) but in the end rejects his "anthropocentric" vision because of misgivings about its feasibility for Christians (211-14), the methodology underpinning it (199-201), and the extent to which it takes difference seriously enough.
Durrell fans will treasure this selection of rare nonfiction, while scholars of Durrell, Modernist literature, anti-authoritarian artists, and the Personalist movement will also appreciate Gifford's fine editorial work.
Jacques Maritain once quipped that "nothing can be more remote from the facts than the belief that 'personalism' is one school or doctrine," as some personalist philosophies "have nothing more in common than the term 'person.
Stephenson situates Kaufman's poems within three categories: "the personalist lyric, the poem as social protest, and the visionary poem," providing close readings of representative examples from each of Kaufman's books (21).