personate

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per·son·ate 1

 (pûr′sə-nāt′)
tr.v. per·son·at·ed, per·son·at·ing, per·son·ates
1. To play the role or portray the part of (a character).
2. To assume the character or appearance of, especially fraudulently; impersonate.

[Late Latin persōnāre, persōnāt-, to bear the character of, represent, from Latin persōna, person; see person.]

per′son·a′tion n.
per′son·a′tive adj.
per′son·a′tor n.

per·son·ate 2

 (pûr′sə-nĭt)
adj. Botany
Having two lips, with the throat closed by a prominent palate. Used of a corolla, such as that of the snapdragon.

[Latin persōnātus, masked, from persōna, mask; see person.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

personate

(ˈpɜːsəˌneɪt)
vb (tr)
1. (Theatre) to act the part of (a character in a play); portray
2. a less common word for personify
3. (Law) criminal law to assume the identity of (another person) with intent to deceive
ˌpersonˈation n
ˈpersonative adj
ˈpersonˌator n

personate

(ˈpɜːsənɪt; -ˌneɪt)
adj
(Botany) (of the corollas of certain flowers) having two lips in the form of a face
[C18: from New Latin persōnātus masked, from Latin persōna; see person]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

per•son•ate

(ˈpɜr səˌneɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to portray (as a character in a play).
2. to impersonate, esp. with fraudulent intent.
3. to personify.
[1590–1600; v. use of Latin persōnātus personate2]
per`son•a′tion, n.
per′son•a`tive, adj.
per′son•a`tor, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

personate


Past participle: personated
Gerund: personating

Imperative
personate
personate
Present
I personate
you personate
he/she/it personates
we personate
you personate
they personate
Preterite
I personated
you personated
he/she/it personated
we personated
you personated
they personated
Present Continuous
I am personating
you are personating
he/she/it is personating
we are personating
you are personating
they are personating
Present Perfect
I have personated
you have personated
he/she/it has personated
we have personated
you have personated
they have personated
Past Continuous
I was personating
you were personating
he/she/it was personating
we were personating
you were personating
they were personating
Past Perfect
I had personated
you had personated
he/she/it had personated
we had personated
you had personated
they had personated
Future
I will personate
you will personate
he/she/it will personate
we will personate
you will personate
they will personate
Future Perfect
I will have personated
you will have personated
he/she/it will have personated
we will have personated
you will have personated
they will have personated
Future Continuous
I will be personating
you will be personating
he/she/it will be personating
we will be personating
you will be personating
they will be personating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been personating
you have been personating
he/she/it has been personating
we have been personating
you have been personating
they have been personating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been personating
you will have been personating
he/she/it will have been personating
we will have been personating
you will have been personating
they will have been personating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been personating
you had been personating
he/she/it had been personating
we had been personating
you had been personating
they had been personating
Conditional
I would personate
you would personate
he/she/it would personate
we would personate
you would personate
they would personate
Past Conditional
I would have personated
you would have personated
he/she/it would have personated
we would have personated
you would have personated
they would have personated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.personate - pretend to be someone you are not; sometimes with fraudulent intentions; "She posed as the Czar's daughter"
masquerade - pretend to be someone or something that you are not; "he is masquerading as an expert on the internet"; "This silly novel is masquerading as a serious historical treaty"
deceive, lead astray, betray - cause someone to believe an untruth; "The insurance company deceived me when they told me they were covering my house"
2.personate - attribute human qualities to something; "The Greeks personated their gods ridiculous"
ascribe, attribute, impute, assign - attribute or credit to; "We attributed this quotation to Shakespeare"; "People impute great cleverness to cats"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

personate

[ˈpɜːsəneɪt] VT (= impersonate) → hacerse pasar por (Theat) → hacer el papel de
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This is all the more surprising given the fact that Hardy himself referred to his poems, notably those in Satires of Circumstance (1914) as "dramatic and personative"--that is to say, the poems ventriloquize the voices of assumed characters, impersonated identities, personifications, and masqueraders.
Trehearne shows in patient detail how the four poets undertake this project, with two of them (Page and Klein) eventually falling silent and two (Layton and Dudek) advancing to a more 'personative' style.
In this respect they closely resemble Hardy's "dramatic or personative" poems, especially those from his Poems of 1912-13: "The Going," "The Voice," "After a Journey," and "A Wet August," for example, though Hardy is frequently more dramatic and ironic.(31) But the similarities abound: both Pound and Hardy are often concerned with the reality of memory and retrospection, regret and melancholy, time and consolation.