personpower

personpower

(ˈpɜːsənˌpaʊə)
n
the power or influence of a person
References in periodicals archive ?
More people in the household could mean the personpower to grow more of your own food.
The rise in poverty law, however, was not simply a response to the demands of a legal profession that needed the requisite skills and personpower to provide services to the poor.
In the Pauline mission, houses served not only as meeting places for the worship services but also as Missional support bases that provided the personpower for Missional outreach to the city and beyond.
As the working force declined, with the disappearance of the Taino culture, the Africans were brought to make up for that lack of personpower.
specific members of minority populations, persons in poverty and on welfare, single parents, the frail elderly) requiring specific forms of help to cope with changing social and economic conditions; in other legislation, the focus has been on groups of youth or adults who needed to be classified regarding their ability to perform specific jobs or to be provided with career direction relevant to national goals of finding personpower who could effectively serve the nation's military needs or its scientific needs.
If management provides formal training for the staff and authorizes adequate personpower to get the work done, then the supervisor's available time for supervisory tasks could be tripled.
Numerous students from my classes at Baylor University provided much of the personpower needed in the field segments of the project; most notable among these were graduate students Russ Fraze and Rick Wiedenmann.
Faculty and staff, of course, are never fired or even laid off; rather, they ar "seasonally adjusted," "decruited" or "dehired," "selected out" or "optioned out," "excessed," "nonrenewed," "repositioned" or "realigned" or "restructured, "subjected to negative personpower adjustment," "constructively terminated" or "involuntarily terminated.
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