persuader

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per·suade

 (pər-swād′)
tr.v. per·suad·ed, per·suad·ing, per·suades
To cause (someone) to accept a point of view or to undertake a course of action by means of argument, reasoning, or entreaty: "to make children fit to live in a society by persuading them to learn and accept its codes" (Alan W. Watts). See Usage Note at convince.

[Latin persuādēre : per-, per- + suādēre, to urge; see swād- in Indo-European roots.]

per·suad′a·ble adj.
per·suad′er n.
Synonyms: persuade, induce, prevail, convince
These verbs mean to succeed in causing a person to do or consent to something. Persuade means to win someone over, as by reasoning or force of personality: Nothing could persuade her to change her mind. To induce is to lead, as to a course of action, by means of influence or persuasion: "Pray what could induce him to commit so rash an action?" (Oliver Goldsmith).
One prevails on somebody who resists: "He had prevailed upon the king to spare them" (Daniel Defoe).
To convince is to persuade by the use of argument or evidence: The salesman convinced me that the car was worth the price.

per•suad•er

(pərˈsweɪ dər)

n.
1. one that persuades.
2. Slang. something, as a gun, used to coerce.
[1530–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.persuader - someone who tries to persuade or induce or lead on
communicator - a person who communicates with others
lobbyist - someone who is employed to persuade legislators to vote for legislation that favors the lobbyist's employer
Svengali - someone (usually maleficent) who tries to persuade or force another person to do his bidding
coaxer, wheedler - someone who tries to persuade by blandishment and coaxing
Translations

persuader

nÜberredungskünstler(in) m(f); the hidden persuadersdie geheimen Verführer
References in classic literature ?
After a fourth persuader, he drifted into it himself, in a quite simple and natural way:
But for that gentle persuader they must have tossed, unsoothed, the night through; for the whiskey was for me.
It explains common career myths; careers for compassionate people, analytical people, creative people, people who are hands-on, organizers, and persuaders; connecting college majors to careers; making big career decisions; what to do if stuck; unique circumstances like adult students, single parents, those who are unemployed, career changers, LGBT students, and students with special needs; and skills for career readiness.
He epitomised the perfect English gent and we cannot forget his memorable roles in hit shows The Saint and The Persuaders.
And when you look at what he's done - Bond came relatively late, after The Saint, The Persuaders! and much more - you realise what a lot there is to talk about.
An Evening With Sir Roger Moore sees the debonair 89-year-old actor and Unicef ambassador, who played 007 in seven movies from 1973 to 1985 and starred in legendary TV series like The Saint and The Persuaders, being interviewed on stage by his biographer Gareth Owen and sharing anecdotes about his extraordinary life in showbusiness.
In the past, only people hired by managers to directly influence employees --"persuaders"--had to be disclosed to the DOL.
The venue will be providing plenty of entertainment for all rock-enthusists by having live on stage Colin Paul and the Persuaders, plus a set from DJ John Black - playing all the classics from 1950's rock 'n' roll.
Then Iwas in Edinburgh for a film premiere but I can't for the life of me remember what the film was." Moore portrayed Simon Templar in The Saint on television from 1962 to 1969 and Lord Brett Sinclair in the TV series The Persuaders from 1971-1972.
The former Bond star will be discussing his life and career, with inside stories and anecdotes ranging from his internationally-renowned TV series The Saint and The Persuaders, through to Hollywood blockbusters and the 007 films.
Meanwhile Roger Moore's signature Aston Martin from hit 1970s action adventure show The Persuaders sold at auction for PS533,000.
Communication that was previously considered advice would now carry onerous requirements for employers--most of whom are small businesses without in-house legal counsel--and third-party advisors, now considered "persuaders," would be required to produce forms for each of their clients or potentially face criminal charges.