petal

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pet·al

 (pĕt′l)
n.
One of the often brightly colored parts of a flower immediately surrounding the reproductive organs; a division of the corolla.

[New Latin petalum, from Greek petalon, leaf; see petə- in Indo-European roots.]

pet′aled, pet′alled adj.

petal

(ˈpɛtəl)
n
(Botany) any of the separate parts of the corolla of a flower: often brightly coloured
[C18: from New Latin petalum, from Greek petalon leaf; related to petannunai to lie open]
ˈpetaline adj
ˈpetal-ˌlike adj
ˈpetalled adj

pet•al

(ˈpɛt l)

n.
one of the often colored segments of the corolla of a flower.
[1695–1705; < New Latin petalum; Latin: metal plate < Greek pétalon thin plate, leaf, n. use of neuter of pétalos spread out, akin to petannýnai to be open]
pet′aled, pet′alled, adj.

pet·al

(pĕt′l)
One of the often brightly colored parts of a flower surrounding the reproductive organs. Petals may be separate or joined at their bases. As a group, the petals are called the corolla. See more at flower.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.petal - part of the perianth that is usually brightly coloredpetal - part of the perianth that is usually brightly colored
floral leaf - a modified leaf that is part of a flower
corolla - (botany) the whorl of petals of a flower that collectively form an inner floral envelope or layer of the perianth; "we cultivate the flower for its corolla"
Translations
بَتْلَه، تُوَيْجِيَّه
korunní plátek
kronblad
szirom
krónublaî
žiedlapis
ziedlapa
okvetný lístok
cvetni list
taç yaprak

petal

[ˈpetl] Npétalo m

petal

[ˈpɛtəl] npétale mPE teacher nprofesseur mf de sport

petal

nBlütenblatt nt; settle petal! (Brit inf: = calm down) → beruhige dich, jetzt komm mal runter (inf)

petal

[ˈpɛtl] npetalo

petal

(ˈpetl) noun
one of the usually brightly coloured leaf-like parts of a flower. This rose has yellow petals edged with pink.
References in classic literature ?
The black, rich soil had fed itself with the decay of a long period of time; such as fallen leaves, the petals of flowers, and the stalks and seed--vessels of vagrant and lawless plants, more useful after their death than ever while flaunting in the sun.
But no--eventide is as pleasant to him as to me, and this antique garden as attractive; and he strolls on, now lifting the gooseberry- tree branches to look at the fruit, large as plums, with which they are laden; now taking a ripe cherry from the wall; now stooping towards a knot of flowers, either to inhale their fragrance or to admire the dew-beads on their petals.
And when the sunshine grew strong and lasting, so that the buttercups were thick in the meadows, Silas might be seen in the sunny midday, or in the late afternoon when the shadows were lengthening under the hedgerows, strolling out with uncovered head to carry Eppie beyond the Stone-pits to where the flowers grew, till they reached some favourite bank where he could sit down, while Eppie toddled to pluck the flowers, and make remarks to the winged things that murmured happily above the bright petals, calling "Dad-dad's" attention continually by bringing him the flowers.
Harry, imagine a girl, hardly seventeen years of age, with a little, flowerlike face, a small Greek head with plaited coils of dark-brown hair, eyes that were violet wells of passion, lips that were like the petals of a rose.
Then she went home and planted the barley-corn; immediately there grew out of it a large and beautiful flower, which looked like a tulip, but the petals were tightly closed as if it were still only a bud.
When the circular deposit of these fallen petals resembled a layer of snow the owner of the trees might hope for an abundant supply of cider.
And as we drove by I could see the green grass under the trees spangled with the fallen petals.
The white petals re-entered their red cases, the flowers faded as I looked, and the bush changed into a block of stony knobs.
I saw a number of tall spikes of strange white flowers, measuring a foot perhaps across the spread of the waxen petals.
To look on beautiful things is only to feel more poignantly the passing of bright days, and the time when the petals must leave the rose.
As I was painting the bright petals of a blue bell, it told me this tale.
One was perfectly charming, delicate, pensive, shaded by beautiful dark hair, and eyes soft as velvet, like those lovely flowers, the heartsease, in which shine out the golden petals.