petard

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pe·tard

 (pĭ-tärd′)
n.
1. A small bell-shaped bomb used to breach a gate or wall.
2. A loud firecracker.
Idiom:
be hoist with one's own petard
To be undone by one's own schemes.

[French pétard, from Old French, from peter, to break wind, from pet, a breaking of wind, from Latin pēditum, from neuter past participle of pēdere, to break wind; see pezd- in Indo-European roots.]
Word History: The idiom to be hoist by one's own petard originates in Shakespeare's Hamlet (written around 1600). In the play, Claudius, the Danish king and Hamlet's stepfather, entreats two of Hamlet's schoolfellows, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, to betray Hamlet—the pair are to escort Hamlet to England, carrying a letter instructing the English king to put Hamlet to death. Learning of the plot to kill him, Hamlet contemplates how to turn the tables against them: "For 'tis the sport to have the enginer / Hoist with his own petar; and't shall go hard / But I will delve one yard below their mines / And blow them at the moon." Hoist is the past participle of hoise, an earlier form of the verb hoist, "to be lifted up," while a petar or petard is a small bomb used in early modern warfare. The phrase "hoist with his own petard" therefore means "to be blown up with his own bomb." Contemporary audiences must have been struck by Shakespeare's turn of phrase, because it soon became a commonplace expression in 17th-century English.

petard

(pɪˈtɑːd)
n
1. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) (formerly) a device containing explosives used to breach a wall, doors, etc
2. hoist with one's own petard being the victim of one's own schemes
3. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a type of explosive firework
[C16: from French: firework, from péter to break wind, from Latin pēdere]

pe•tard

(pɪˈtɑrd)

n.
1. an explosive device formerly used in warfare to blow in a door or gate, form a breach in a wall, etc.
2. a firecracker making a loud noise.
Idioms:
hoist by or with one's own petard, caught by the very device one had contrived to hurt another.
[1598; < Middle French, =pet(er) to break wind (derivative of pet < Latin pēditum a breaking wind, orig. neuter past participle of pēdere to break wind) + -ard -ard]

petard

An artwork produced to draw attention to itself through unusual composition, subject matter, etc.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.petard - an explosive device used to break down a gate or wallpetard - an explosive device used to break down a gate or wall
explosive device - device that bursts with sudden violence from internal energy
Translations

petard

[peˈtɑːd] Npetardo m
he was hoist with his own petardle salió el tiro por la culata

petard

nPetarde f ? hoist

petard

[pɪˈtɑːd] to be hoist with one's own petardessere preso/a nelle proprie reti
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