petit jury


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pet·it jury

also pet·ty jury  (pĕt′ē)
n.
See jury1.

petit jury

n
(Law) a jury of 12 persons empanelled to determine the facts of a case and decide the issue pursuant to the direction of the court on points of law. Also called: petty jury Compare grand jury
petit juror n

pet′ty

(or pet′it) ju′ry


n.
a jury, usu. of 12 persons, impaneled to render a verdict in a civil or criminal proceeding (disting. from grand jury).
[1680–90]
pet′ty ju′ror, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.petit jury - a jury of 12 to determine the facts and decide the issue in civil or criminal proceedings
jury - a body of citizens sworn to give a true verdict according to the evidence presented in a court of law
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
petit juror, petty juror - a member of a petit jury
Translations

petit jury

n˜ Geschworene pl
References in periodicals archive ?
whole Petit Jury must agree in the same Judgment; So that twenty
American criminal procedure developed on the assumption that grand juries and petit jury trials were the ultimate safeguards of fair procedures and accurate outcomes.
Louisiana, "[t]he unmistakable import of this Court's opinions, at least since (1940) and not repudiated by intervening decisions, is that the selection of a petit jury from a representative cross section of the community is an essential component of the Sixth Amendment right to a jury trial.
The Department of Justice continues to investigate possible federal civil rights charges against Pantaleo, a strategy that appears more promising given the chance that a different grand or petit jury (drawn from a broader pool of an entire federal district) may view and interpret that video differently.
Further, the critical characteristic of impartiality in the petit jury is ensured, in part, by the fact that the roll and the panel are produced through a random selection process.
DISQUALIFICATION TO SERVE AS A GRAND OR PETIT JUROR FREQUENTLY USED WORDS AND PHRASES GRAND JURY AND PETIT JURY DISTINGUISHED HISTORY OF THE GRAND JURY THE GRAND JURY AS AN ACCUSING AND INVESTIGATIVE BODY OFFICERS OF THE GRAND JURY PROCEDURES PROCEEDINGS OF THE GRAND JURY DETERMINATION WHETHER TO RETURN AN INDICTMENT OR A NO TRUE BILL THE STATE ATTORNEY (OR THE STATEWIDE PROSECUTOR) AS LEGAL ADVISOR TO THE GRAND JURY SECRECY OF GRAND JURY PROCEEDINGS PROTECTION AND IMMUNITY OF GRAND JURORS ON BEING A GRAND JUROR--SOME PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS CONCLUSION
The Impartial Jury Clause of the Sixth Amendment requires that the venire from which the state and the defendant draw a twelve-person petit jury be a fair cross-section of the community.
A grand jury is traditionally larger than and distinguishable from a petit jury or the trial jury, which is used during a trial.
For example, the jury pool and the petit jury selection processes proceed in much the same fashion in both federal civil and criminal trials, with the only significant difference being the number of peremptory challenges afforded to each party following voir dire.
Together, the prosecutor and gang expert will develop the questions necessary to illicit crucial testimony and evidence before the grand jury, and likewise, necessary evidence and testimony before the petit jury to obtain a conviction.
Louisiana, (147) the Supreme Court emphasized its oft-repeated finding that "the selection of a petit jury from a representative cross section of the community is an essential component of the Sixth Amendment right to a jury trial.
An indictment during this time was tantamount to conviction, as petit jury trials were not in existence (100) and defendants instead faced trial by ordeal, which might require the defendant to stick her hand in boiling water and sustain no injury, or avoid drowning without swimming when placed in a lake, in order to prove innocence.