pettiness

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pet·ty

 (pĕt′ē)
adj. pet·ti·er, pet·ti·est
1. Of small importance; trivial: a petty grievance. See Synonyms at trivial.
2. Showing an excessive concern with unimportant matters or minor details, especially in a narrow-minded way: petty partisanship.
3.
a. Of lesser importance or rank; subordinate: a petty prince.
b. Law Variant of petit.

[Middle English peti, from Old French, variant of petit; see petit.]

pet′ti·ly adv.
pet′ti·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pettiness - narrowness of mind or ideas or views
narrow-mindedness, narrowness - an inclination to criticize opposing opinions or shocking behavior
2.pettiness - the quality of being unimportant and petty or frivolouspettiness - the quality of being unimportant and petty or frivolous
unimportance - the quality of not being important or worthy of note
joke - a triviality not to be taken seriously; "I regarded his campaign for mayor as a joke"
3.pettiness - lack of generosity in trifling matters

pettiness

noun
Translations
صِغَر، تفاهَه
malichernost
smålighed
csekélység
lágkúra; smámunasemi
malichernosť
bayağılık

pettiness

[ˈpetɪnɪs] N (= small-mindedness) → mezquindad f, estrechez f de miras; (= triviality) → insignificancia f, nimiedad f

pettiness

[ˈpɛtinɪs] n (= small mindedness) → mesquinerie f

pettiness

n
(= trivial nature)Unbedeutendheit f, → Belanglosigkeit f, → Unwichtigkeit f; (of excuse)Billigkeit f; (of crime)Geringfügigkeit f
(= small-mindedness)Kleinlichkeit f; (of remark)spitzer Charakter

pettiness

[ˈpɛtɪnɪs] n (small-mindedness) → meschinità f inv

petty

(ˈpeti) adjective
1. of very little importance; trivial. petty details.
2. deliberately nasty for a foolish or trivial reason. petty behaviour.
ˈpettily adverb
ˈpettiness noun
petty cash
money used for small, everyday expenses in an office etc.
References in classic literature ?
The bookkeeper's life was made up of innumerable little pettinesses.
In these unsettling and witty essays, Emil always goes for the jugular in his razor-sharp jabs at the `isms,' pettinesses and follies that deny us our humanity," said noted Asian American scholar and author Ron Takaki, whose work includes Of A Different Mirror and Strangers From a Different Shore.