petulant

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Related to petulancy: annoying

pet·u·lant

 (pĕch′ə-lənt)
adj.
1. Unreasonably irritable or ill-tempered; peevish.
2. Contemptuous in speech or behavior.

[Latin petulāns, petulant-, insolent, from petere, to assail; see pet- in Indo-European roots.]

pet′u·lance, pet′u·lan·cy n.
pet′u·lant·ly adv.

petulant

(ˈpɛtjʊlənt)
adj
irritable, impatient, or sullen in a peevish or capricious way
[C16: via Old French from Latin petulāns bold, from petulāre (unattested) to attack playfully, from petere to assail]
ˈpetulance, ˈpetulancy n
ˈpetulantly adv

pet•u•lant

(ˈpɛtʃ ə lənt)

adj.
showing sudden irritation, esp. over some trifling annoyance; peevish.
[1590–1600; < Latin petulant- (s. of petulāns) impudent]
pet′u•lance, n.
pet′u•lant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.petulant - easily irritated or annoyed; "an incorrigibly fractious young man"; "not the least nettlesome of his countrymen"
ill-natured - having an irritable and unpleasant disposition

petulant

petulant

adjective
Translations
popudlivý

petulant

[ˈpetjʊlənt] ADJ [person, voice, tone] → malhumorado, irritable; [gesture] → malhumorado, de irritación

petulant

[ˈpɛtʃʊlənt] adjirritable

petulant

adjverdrießlich; childbockig (inf)

petulant

[ˈpɛtjʊlənt] adjirritabile
References in classic literature ?
This project could not be of any great expense to the public; and might in my poor opinion, be of much use for the despatch of business, in those countries where senates have any share in the legislative power; beget unanimity, shorten debates, open a few mouths which are now closed, and close many more which are now open; curb the petulancy of the young, and correct the positiveness of the old; rouse the stupid, and damp the pert.
The fact is this presidency has become the imperial petulancy," Perry said.
There is also increasing concern over the extent to which early interventions are effective in reaching those families most in need of support and highly isolated families, reflected in funding and policy mandates that refer to hard-to-reach families (Cortis, Katz, & Petulancy, 2009).