pewter


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pew·ter

 (pyo͞o′tər)
n.
1. Any of numerous silver-gray alloys of tin with various amounts of antimony, copper, and sometimes lead, used widely for fine kitchen utensils and tableware.
2. Pewter articles considered as a group.

[Middle English pewtre, from Old French peutre, from Vulgar Latin *piltrum; perhaps akin to spelter.]

pew′ter adj.

pewter

(ˈpjuːtə)
n
1. (Metallurgy)
a. any of various alloys containing tin (80–90 per cent), lead (10–20 per cent), and sometimes small amounts of other metals, such as copper and antimony
b. (as modifier): pewter ware; a pewter tankard.
2. (Colours)
a. a bluish-grey colour
b. (as adjective): pewter tights.
3. (Cookery) plate or kitchen utensils made from pewter
[C14: from Old French peaultre, of obscure origin; related to Old Provençal peltre pewter]
ˈpewterer n

pew•ter

(ˈpyu tər)

n.
1. any of various alloys in which tin is the chief constituent, orig. one of tin and lead.
2. utensils and vessels made of pewter.
adj.
3. consisting or made of pewter.
[1325–75; Middle English pewtre < Middle French peutre < Vulgar Latin *piltrum; perhaps akin to spelter]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pewter - any of various alloys of tin with small amounts of other metals (especially lead)pewter - any of various alloys of tin with small amounts of other metals (especially lead)
alloy, metal - a mixture containing two or more metallic elements or metallic and nonmetallic elements usually fused together or dissolving into each other when molten; "brass is an alloy of zinc and copper"
Translations
سَبِيكَةُ الْبِيُوتِرسَبيكَة من القَصْدير والرَّصاص
cín
tin
tina
kositar
ónötvözet
pjátur
白目
백랍
alavasalavinis
alvaalvas-
cíncínový
tenn
โลหะผสมดีบุกกับตะกั่ว
kalay ve kurşun alaşımıtutya
hợp kim thiếc

pewter

[ˈpjuːtəʳ]
A. Npeltre m
B. CPDde peltre

pewter

[ˈpjuːtər] nétain m

pewter

n (= alloy)Zinn nt; (= vessel)Zinnbecher m; (= articles)Zinn(geschirr) nt

pewter

[ˈpjuːtəʳ] npeltro

pewter

(ˈpjuːtə) noun, adjective
(of) a metal made by mixing tin and lead. That mug is (made of) pewter; a pewter mug.

pewter

سَبِيكَةُ الْبِيُوتِر cín tin Zinn κασσιτερόχαλκος peltre tina étain kositar peltro 白目 백랍 tin tinn stop cyny z ołowiem latão, peltre сплав олова со свинцом tenn โลหะผสมดีบุกกับตะกั่ว tutya hợp kim thiếc 白蜡
References in classic literature ?
I have two pewter soldiers--this is one of them, and he shall have it, for I know he is so very, very lonely.
Receiving the brimming pewter, and turning to the harpooneers, he ordered them to produce their weapons.
In the obscure parlour of a low public-house, in the filthiest part of Little Saffron Hill; a dark and gloomy den, where a flaring gas-light burnt all day in the winter-time; and where no ray of sun ever shone in the summer: there sat, brooding over a little pewter measure and a small glass, strongly impregnated with the smell of liquor, a man in a velveteen coat, drab shorts, half-boots and stockings, whom even by that dim light no experienced agent of the police would have hesitated to recognise as Mr.
All round the room big barrels stood against the walls, fastened at the bottom so they wouldn't tumble with the rolling of the ship; and above the barrels, pewter jugs of all sizes hung from wooden pegs.
One end, indeed, reflected splendidly both light and heat from ranks of immense pewter dishes, interspersed with silver jugs and tankards, towering row after row, on a vast oak dresser, to the very roof.
Hetty Sorrel often took the opportunity, when her aunt's back was turned, of looking at the pleasing reflection of herself in those polished surfaces, for the oak table was usually turned up like a screen, and was more for ornament than for use; and she could see herself sometimes in the great round pewter dishes that were ranged on the shelves above the long deal dinner-table, or in the hobs of the grate, which always shone like jasper.
A clean cloth was spread before him, with knife, fork, and spoon, salt-cellar, pepper-box, glass, and pewter ale-pot.
On the table -- in token that the sentiment of old English hospitality had not been left behind -- stood a large pewter tankard, at the bottom of which, had Hester or Pearl peeped into it, they might have seen the frothy remnant of a recent draught of ale.
In fact, there was no one to see but the servants, and when their master was away they lived a luxurious life below stairs, where there was a huge kitchen hung about with shining brass and pewter, and a large servants' hall where there were four or five abundant meals eaten every day, and where a great deal of lively romping went on when Mrs.
Get thine iron pot on thy head then, friend Sluggard, as quickly as thy nature will permit,'' said the hermit, ``while I remove these pewter flagons, whose late contents run strangely in mine own pate; and to drown the clatter for, in faith, I feel somewhat unsteady strike into the tune which thou hearest me sing; it is no matter for the words I scarce know them myself.
Next, they rigged a table about the centre-pole, and on it placed pewter pitchers, basins, soap, and the whitest of towels-- one set for each man; they pointed to pockets in the tent, and said we could put our small trifles in them for convenience, and if we needed pins or such things, they were sticking every where.
In one hand he grasped a thick staff pointed and shod with metal, while in the other he held his coif or bonnet, which bore in its front a broad pewter medal stamped with the image of Our Lady of Rocamadour.