pewter

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pew·ter

 (pyo͞o′tər)
n.
1. Any of numerous silver-gray alloys of tin with various amounts of antimony, copper, and sometimes lead, used widely for fine kitchen utensils and tableware.
2. Pewter articles considered as a group.

[Middle English pewtre, from Old French peutre, from Vulgar Latin *piltrum; perhaps akin to spelter.]

pew′ter adj.

pewter

(ˈpjuːtə)
n
1. (Metallurgy)
a. any of various alloys containing tin (80–90 per cent), lead (10–20 per cent), and sometimes small amounts of other metals, such as copper and antimony
b. (as modifier): pewter ware; a pewter tankard.
2. (Colours)
a. a bluish-grey colour
b. (as adjective): pewter tights.
3. (Cookery) plate or kitchen utensils made from pewter
[C14: from Old French peaultre, of obscure origin; related to Old Provençal peltre pewter]
ˈpewterer n

pew•ter

(ˈpyu tər)

n.
1. any of various alloys in which tin is the chief constituent, orig. one of tin and lead.
2. utensils and vessels made of pewter.
adj.
3. consisting or made of pewter.
[1325–75; Middle English pewtre < Middle French peutre < Vulgar Latin *piltrum; perhaps akin to spelter]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pewter - any of various alloys of tin with small amounts of other metals (especially lead)pewter - any of various alloys of tin with small amounts of other metals (especially lead)
alloy, metal - a mixture containing two or more metallic elements or metallic and nonmetallic elements usually fused together or dissolving into each other when molten; "brass is an alloy of zinc and copper"
Translations
سَبِيكَةُ الْبِيُوتِرسَبيكَة من القَصْدير والرَّصاص
cín
tin
tina
kositar
ónötvözet
pjátur
白目
백랍
alavasalavinis
alvaalvas-
cíncínový
tenn
โลหะผสมดีบุกกับตะกั่ว
kalay ve kurşun alaşımıtutya
hợp kim thiếc

pewter

[ˈpjuːtəʳ]
A. Npeltre m
B. CPDde peltre

pewter

[ˈpjuːtər] nétain m

pewter

n (= alloy)Zinn nt; (= vessel)Zinnbecher m; (= articles)Zinn(geschirr) nt

pewter

[ˈpjuːtəʳ] npeltro

pewter

(ˈpjuːtə) noun, adjective
(of) a metal made by mixing tin and lead. That mug is (made of) pewter; a pewter mug.

pewter

سَبِيكَةُ الْبِيُوتِر cín tin Zinn κασσιτερόχαλκος peltre tina étain kositar peltro 白目 백랍 tin tinn stop cyny z ołowiem latão, peltre сплав олова со свинцом tenn โลหะผสมดีบุกกับตะกั่ว tutya hợp kim thiếc 白蜡
References in periodicals archive ?
12) Whatever the case, the cashiered foot soldiers, apprentices, house-servants, aliens (Huguenots, Flems), tailors, scriveners, yeomen, citizens, butchers, brewers, pewterers, cordwainers, Cartwrights, and so on in Shakespeare's audience, to say nothing of nearly all the women in the crowd, were not--and never would be--gentlemen (or gentlewomen).
Around 1,200 well-preserved pieces include plates, platters, porringers, salts and flagons, some carrying the marks of pewterers in Antwerp and Bruges, but many others made in England for the export market.
Moments after Barbara Payne strolled down the quiet little alley, she had taken the decision to put an offer in to buy Pewterers House.
The Worshipful Company of Pewterers, the ancient guild based in the City of London, has been trying to improve the public's perception of the metal.
Dating from 1717 its inscriptions translate as "This is the loving cup of the Most Worshipful Company of Pewterers, 24 June 1717" and "Drink and be Merry so that we are all friends together".
British-Romano platters recovered from the bed of the River Thames are followed by a pilgrim badge, chargers from Shakespeare's day, a tankard engraved with images, a teapot and a display of modern designs in pewter, lent by the Worshipful Company of Pewterers.
Artisans such as potters, glass artists, and pewterers can be observed practicing their trade.
Sixteen of the guilds were serious contributors and thus founders (mercers, drapers, fishmongers, goldsmiths, salters, ironmongers, clothworkers, dyers, leathersellers, pewterers, armourers and braziers, carpenters, cordwainers, coopers, plaisterers, and needlemakers) though other guilds later contributed and had members on the board of governors.
It can then be rolled into thin sheets and shaped, as the pewterers did in Birmingham and Sheffield, or cast in moulds as happened in Bewdley.