peyotist

peyotist

(ˈpeɪəʊtɪst)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religions) a person who follows the religion of peyotism
References in periodicals archive ?
Peyotist Episcopalian Albert Hensley, who left not one but two autobiographies behind (Brumble).
Even nowadays, entheogens are consumed in the rituals of the peyotist Native American Church (Stewart 1987), as well as by ayahuasca-using syncretic religions such as Santo Daime and Uniao do Vegetal (Dobkin de Rios 1971).
He wanted Indians to engage in the civic life of America, but to keep what was good in Indian cultures, such as ethical and moral teachings, something a Peyotist would support.
Frank Ross)' On the top of the first page is written: "Report of Indian Pow-wow Jan 21,1908 considering the 'Mescal Bean' Bill)' These notes record the key points made by seven speakers: three Peyotists, Quanah Parker (Comanche), Otto Wells (Kiowa), and Black Dog (Osage); an Indian non-Peyotist, Joseph Pointer (Cheyenne-Arapaho); the Indians' lawyer, T.
In 1927, Kiowa Jim Tongkeamah, a peyotist and "dance road" enthusiast, lost a son, who, before death, incurred a near-death experience in which he claimed to have entered Heaven; he begged his father to convert to Christianity.
In contemporary times, themes of authenticity and tradition abound: peyotist, Christian, and traditional symbols form a "synthetic collage" of intersecting spiritual paths that often lead to division and opposition among Kiowa people, while the theme of "respect for diversity" is seen as the foremost virtue.
Smith, our understandings of (1) all Indian religious freedoms, (2) the legality of Native American Church of North America peyotist practices, and (3) historically sound uses of Public Law 280, were swept away by a conservative activist decision handed down by the United States Supreme Court written by Justice Scalia.
John Wilson, or "Moon Head," the famous Caddo-Delaware peyotist, was also a Ghost Dance leader (Mooney 1896:901-905).
18) That "[p]laintiffs call[ed] their practice religious, call[ed] themselves peyotists, ha[d] included 'Native American Church' in their name, .
For example, it is estimated that approximately 50% of Navajos are peyotists.
To allow the Free Exercise Clause to approach its textual meaning would subject the nation to a full spectral parade of horrors that must necessarily ensue if a State were to be forced to allow peyotists to consume their sacrament under ritual conditions: "[I]f 'compelling interest' really means what it says .
If we wish to deal with Leech Lake's actually existing nation, we must include Catholics, Episcopalians, Lutherans, a wide array of evangelicals, NAC peyotists, Mormons, and a whole lot of atheists, along with Midewiwin initiates and other traditionalists, when talking about Ojibwe religions.